BIOL 301 6382 Eighteen year old college sophomore Maddie has exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, formerly known as exercise-induced asthma

BIOL 301 6382 Eighteen year old college sophomore Maddie has exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, formerly known as exercise-induced asthma

BIOL 301 6382 Eighteen year old college sophomore Maddie has exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, formerly known as exercise-induced asthma

Exercise-Induced Asthma

People with asthma can experience exercise-induced asthma also known as exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. during exercise such as swimming, a person breathes faster and deep to meet the increased oxygen demands (Gawlik et al., 2019). To cater for extra oxygen, a person inhales through the mouth, which is characterized by dry and cool air compared to air breathed through the nose. The dry air causes the airway to narrow a process called bronchoconstriction. This results in asthma-related symptoms including shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing, and chest tightness.

When the body responds during activity with exercise-induced asthma, the logical explanation would be that the

BIOL 301 6382 Eighteen year old college sophomore Maddie has exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, formerly known as exercise-induced asthma
BIOL 301 6382 Eighteen year old college sophomore Maddie has exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, formerly known as exercise-induced asthma

body does not require exercise. Contrary to this perception, exercise in people with asthma is highly beneficial, but it needs to be done right. Hence, people who experience exercise-induced asthma can start with warm-up activities such as walking or light exercise for 10-15 minutes. Warm-up exercises help to ease the airway allowing it to adjust to the effects of the main activity (Kim & Kwak, 2019). Moreover, people with asthma need exercise as part of the treatment and management of the condition. For instance, exercise enables the lungs to work better by strengthening the breathing muscles. Another benefit of exercise for people with asthma is an immune system boost, which prevents respiratory illnesses. Additionally, exercise aids in weight loss, which lowers the odds of asthma (Gawlik et al., 2019). Finally, exercise results in higher levels of endorphin hormone, which improves mood; thereby reducing stress and depression that sometimes trigger asthma.

Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our Verified MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS: BIOL 301 6382 Eighteen year old college sophomore Maddie has exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, formerly known as exercise-induced asthma

References

Gawlik, R., Kurowski, M., Kowalski, M., Ziętkowski, Z., Pokrywka, A., Krysztofiak, H., . . . Bartuzi, Z. (2019). he position paper of the Polish Society of Allergology and Polish Society of Sports Medicine. Postepy Dermatol Alergol, 36(1):1-10. doi: 10.5114/ada.2019.82820.

Kim, K.-B., & Kwak, Y.-S. (2019). Dehydration affects exercise-induced asthma and anaphylaxis. Journal of exercise Rehabilitation, 15(5): 647-650. https://doi.org/10.12965/jer.1938470.235.