BIOL 301 6382 LeeAnn, a healthy 24-year-old kindergarten teacher, never got vaccinated against the rubella virus and is now pregnant.

BIOL 301 6382 LeeAnn, a healthy 24-year-old kindergarten teacher, never got vaccinated against the rubella virus and is now pregnant.

BIOL 301 6382 LeeAnn, a healthy 24-year-old kindergarten teacher, never got vaccinated against the rubella virus and is now pregnant.

Rubella During Infection

Rubella is a viral infection with a distinctive red rash and is highly contagious. The disease, however, may only cause mild symptoms but is a major concern in pregnant women because of its negative implications for the unborn baby. People who have not gotten rubella vaccination are at increased risk of getting the disease when they come into contact with an infected person. During pregnancy, protection against the infection is critical because of the severe effects it has on fetal development with lasting effects after birth (Mawson & Croft, 2019). More so, this is critical during the first trimester of pregnancy. Rubella infection of a pregnant mother during the first trimester causes congenital rubella syndrome, birth defects, miscarriage, and stillbirth.

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Congenital rubella syndrome is a rubella infection of an infant passed on from a pregnancy rubella infection during

BIOL 301 6382 LeeAnn, a healthy 24-year-old kindergarten teacher, never got vaccinated against the rubella virus and is now pregnant.
BIOL 301 6382 LeeAnn, a healthy 24-year-old kindergarten teacher, never got vaccinated against the rubella virus and is now pregnant.

the first trimester (CDC, 2020). The risk is higher in the first 12 weeks but subsides with the increase in gestational weeks. At 20 weeks gestation, a rubella infection of a pregnant woman is unlikely to cause harm/birth defects to the fetus. As LeeAnn is unvaccinated, the NP will advise her to avoid contact with infected people. This is important to avoid getting infected especially in the first 12 weeks of the trimester because while pregnant, she cannot receive the vaccination.

 

References

CDC. (2020, April 28). Congenital Rubella Syndrome. Retrieved from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/surv-manual/chpt15-crs.html

Mawson, A., & Croft, A. (2019). Rubella Virus Infection, the Congenital Rubella Syndrome, and the Link to Autism. Int J Environ Res Public Health, 16(19), 3543. https://WWW.doi.10.3390/ijerph16193543.