DNP 801 What changes will you need to make in order to have a feasible topic for your PICOT-D?

DNP 801 What changes will you need to make in order to have a feasible topic for your PICOT-D?

DNP 801 What changes will you need to make in order to have a feasible topic for your PICOT-D?

I must be the odd one out here. I did not have a topic in mind when I started this program. I had no idea that I had to have an idea of what I wanted to work on or accomplish when I started this program and it was one of the things that delayed my starting the program in January among other things. Even when I applied, I still had no definite idea of what I wanted to do. So, based on my last stationed unit as a full-time case manager/discharge planner, I chose a topic that was dear to my heart to find a way to fix some of the issues that contributes to people having strokes especially recurrent strokes. Also, not having a practice site as well as a mentor was also another barrier to deciding on a topic and also not being in direct patient care anymore, I am not familiar with all the products and knowledge of all the things that are used in other areas of nursing except for the one in my unit and with discharge planning. Now that I have a mentor, I have to mention this topic to her and she will have to be comfortable with the topic as well or she may not be able to help guide me.

Based on Professor Etheridge’s feedback so far, it appears that my topic may or may not be feasible depending on the angle it takes. It will not be feasible as a nurse to teach preventive or monitoring strategies to other disciplinary professionals such as Physical or Occupational therapists or Nutritionists or even physicians unless I work in collaboration with them but for a nursing DPI project, I should be managing and directing the nurses involved. Also, since this is a quality improvement project, I have to be able to find enough articles that have dealt with this topic that will enable or effect a quality improvement (QI) change. Quality improvement is the framework used by healthcare professionals to improve the quality of health care provided to patients. Therefore, nurses are tasked with being part of the team to improve the quality of care given to patients since they are the primary care providers and very much concerned with the safety of patients (Adolfo, Albougami, Roque, & Almazan, 2021).

I will search more databases and review more articles to look for quality improvement interventions. I will also discuss some more with my mentor and professor to see what other ideas and feedback they will give me. Of which I will implement. If it is still not feasible, then I will have to pick another topic. Something in sepsis or hospital acquired infection.

Reference:

Adolfo, C., Albougami, A., Roque, M., & Almazan, J. (2021). Nurses’ attitudes toward quality improvement in hospitals: Implications for nursing management systems. Nursing Practice Todayhttps://doi.org/10.18502/npt.v8i3.5935 

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After careful consideration and planning, I believe I have a feasible topic for the PICOT-D. At my current organization, an intravenous (IV) team was created to assist with initiating IV access throughout the medical center. Over the years, there has been an increase in IV team calls, ultimately resulting in long wait times for patients which lead to delays in IV access and care. The average wait time for the IV team is about 45 – 60 minutes. The intent of this project is to prevent delays in care by decreasing patient wait times for IV access to less than 30 minutes. This may be achieved by cross-training floor nurses to the IV team. With this, my PICOT-D state: For adult medical-surgical patients admitted to the Alternate Care Units (ACUs), will cross training ACU staff to the IV team (to be proficient with using the AccuVien and ultrasound machine) to decrease patient wait times for IV access to less than 30 minutes in an acute care hospital over eight weeks. Marsh et al (2018) state that having IV experts readily available lead to a decrease in IV attempts, decreased procedure time, and increased patient satisfaction. In addition, Ramer et al (2026) found that training IV experts to proficiently use IV access assistive devices contributed to decreased procedure times as well. With this, cross-training ACU staff may help decrease patient wait times for the IV team and gaining an IV access.

References:

Marsh, N., Webster, J., Larsen, E., Genzel, J., Cooke, M., Mihala, G., Cadigan, S., & Rickard, C. (2018). Expert versus generalist inserters for peripheral intravenous catheter insertion: a pilot randomized controlled trial. Trials19(1), 1–10.

https://doi-org.lopes.idm.oclc.org/10.1186/s13063-018-2946-3

 

Ramer, L., Hunt, P., Ortega, E., Knowlton, J., Briggs, R., & Hirokawa, S. (2016). Effect of intravenous (IV) assistive device (VeinViewer) on IV access attempts, procedural time, and patient and nurse satisfaction. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing33(4), 273–281.

https://doi.org/10.1177/1043454215600425

After careful consideration and planning, I believe I have a feasible topic for the PICOT-D. At my current

DNP 801 What changes will you need to make in order to have a feasible topic for your PICOT-D
DNP 801 What changes will you need to make in order to have a feasible topic for your PICOT-D

organization, an intravenous (IV) team was created to assist with initiating IV access throughout the medical center. Over the years, there has been an increase in IV team calls, ultimately resulting in long wait times for patients which lead to delays in IV access and care. The average wait time for the IV team is about 45 – 60 minutes. The intent of this project is to prevent delays in care by decreasing patient wait times for IV access to less than 30 minutes. This may be achieved by cross-training floor nurses to the IV team. With this, my PICOT-D state: For adult medical-surgical patients admitted to the Alternate Care Units (ACUs), will cross training ACU staff to the IV team (to be proficient with using the AccuVien and ultrasound machine) to decrease patient wait times for IV access to less than 30 minutes in an acute care hospital over eight weeks. Marsh et al (2018) state that having IV experts readily available lead to a decrease in IV attempts, decreased procedure time, and increased patient satisfaction. In addition, Ramer et al (2026) found that training IV experts to proficiently use IV access assistive devices contributed to decreased procedure times as well. With this, cross-training ACU staff may help decrease patient wait times for the IV team and gaining an IV access.

References:

Marsh, N., Webster, J., Larsen, E., Genzel, J., Cooke, M., Mihala, G., Cadigan, S., & Rickard, C. (2018). Expert versus generalist inserters for peripheral intravenous catheter insertion: a pilot randomized controlled trial. Trials19(1), 1–10.

https://doi-org.lopes.idm.oclc.org/10.1186/s13063-018-2946-3

 

Ramer, L., Hunt, P., Ortega, E., Knowlton, J., Briggs, R., & Hirokawa, S. (2016). Effect of intravenous (IV) assistive device (VeinViewer) on IV access attempts, procedural time, and patient and nurse satisfaction. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing33(4), 273–281.

https://doi.org/10.1177/1043454215600425

After careful consideration and planning, I believe I have a feasible topic for the PICOT-D. At my current organization, an intravenous (IV) team was created to assist with initiating IV access throughout the medical center. Over the years, there has been an increase in IV team calls, ultimately resulting in long wait times for patients which lead to delays in IV access and care. The average wait time for the IV team is about 45 – 60 minutes. The intent of this project is to prevent delays in care by decreasing patient wait times for IV access to less than 30 minutes. This may be achieved by cross-training floor nurses to the IV team. With this, my PICOT-D state: For adult medical-surgical patients admitted to the Alternate Care Units (ACUs), will cross training ACU staff to the IV team (to be proficient with using the AccuVien and ultrasound machine) to decrease patient wait times for IV access to less than 30 minutes in an acute care hospital over eight weeks. Marsh et al (2018) state that having IV experts readily available lead to a decrease in IV attempts, decreased procedure time, and increased patient satisfaction. In addition, Ramer et al (2026) found that training IV experts to proficiently use IV access assistive devices contributed to decreased procedure times as well. With this, cross-training ACU staff may help decrease patient wait times for the IV team and gaining an IV access.

References:

Marsh, N., Webster, J., Larsen, E., Genzel, J., Cooke, M., Mihala, G., Cadigan, S., & Rickard, C. (2018). Expert versus generalist inserters for peripheral intravenous catheter insertion: a pilot randomized controlled trial. Trials19(1), 1–10.

https://doi-org.lopes.idm.oclc.org/10.1186/s13063-018-2946-3

 

Ramer, L., Hunt, P., Ortega, E., Knowlton, J., Briggs, R., & Hirokawa, S. (2016). Effect of intravenous (IV) assistive device (VeinViewer) on IV access attempts, procedural time, and patient and nurse satisfaction. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing33(4), 273–281.

https://doi.org/10.1177/1043454215600425