DNP 815 Discuss the differences in approach based on inductive versus deductive reasoning

DNP 815 Discuss the differences in approach based on inductive versus deductive reasoning

DNP 815 Discuss the differences in approach based on inductive versus deductive reasoning

The reasoning is categorized into two types which are inductive or forward and deductive or backward wherein each has different features and plays different roles in providing solutions to complex problems. The inductive reasoning process is that individual facts are observed first before making a conclusion on a principle, however, the deductive reasoning process is solving given problems based on consideration of general principles and knowledge of a solid foundation. In order to achieve the major goal, inductive reasoning or means-ends analysis is considered a data-driven approach and more useful in finding a solution quickly, whereas deductive reasoning or moving backward gradually gets rids of things that are not necessary and spends more time deleting wrong answers or inferences to look for the root causes of a problem (Shin, 2019).

Middle-range theories serve as frameworks for evidence-based projects and research studies in guiding the interpretation and application of the findings where it illuminates research and structure knowledge to build nursing science and nursing practice (Valentine & Sekula, 2020). PICOT is one way to streamline the process of research literature and by using it as a format, it focuses the search for evidence. Concentrating on evidence of effective interventions is a good way of improving clinical judgment and prevents one’s practice of falling into traditional care without any advancements (Black, 2019).

 

The concepts of inductive and deductive reasoning in clinical reasoning apply to gathering appropriate information and making a clinical diagnosis by providing scientific evidence on the outcomes of good quality nursing care.

 

 

References

 

Black, B, P. (2019). The science of nursing and evidence-based practice. Professional Nursing E-Book: Concepts and Challenges, 217.

Professional Nursing E-Book – Google Books

 

Shin, H.S. (2019). Reasoning processes in clinical reasoning: from the perspective of cognitive psychology. Korean Journal of Medical Education, 31 (4), 299-308.

https://doi.org/10.3946/kjme.2019.140

 

Valentine, J.L., Sekula, K., Lynch (2020) Evolution of forensic theory- introduction of the constructed theory of forensic nursing care: A Middle-Range Theory. Journal of Forensic Nursing

Valentine_May2020_Evolution_of_Forensic_Nursing_Theory.pdf (researchgate.net)

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The reasoning is categorized into two types which are inductive or forward and deductive or backward wherein each

DNP 815 Discuss the differences in approach based on inductive versus deductive reasoning
DNP 815 Discuss the differences in approach based on inductive versus deductive reasoning

has different features and plays different roles in providing solutions to complex problems. The inductive reasoning process is that individual facts are observed first before making a conclusion on a principle, however, the deductive reasoning process is solving given problems based on consideration of general principles and knowledge of a solid foundation. In order to achieve the major goal, inductive reasoning or means-ends analysis is considered a data-driven approach and more useful in finding a solution quickly, whereas deductive reasoning or moving backward gradually gets rids of things that are not necessary and spends more time deleting wrong answers or inferences to look for the root causes of a problem (Shin, 2019).

Middle-range theories serve as frameworks for evidence-based projects and research studies in guiding the interpretation and application of the findings where it illuminates research and structure knowledge to build nursing science and nursing practice (Valentine & Sekula, 2020). PICOT is one way to streamline the process of research literature and by using it as a format, it focuses the search for evidence. Concentrating on evidence of effective interventions is a good way of improving clinical judgment and prevents one’s practice of falling into traditional care without any advancements (Black, 2019).

 

The concepts of inductive and deductive reasoning in clinical reasoning apply to gathering appropriate information and making a clinical diagnosis by providing scientific evidence on the outcomes of good quality nursing care.

 

 

References

 

Black, B, P. (2019). The science of nursing and evidence-based practice. Professional Nursing E-Book: Concepts and Challenges, 217.

Professional Nursing E-Book – Google Books

 

Shin, H.S. (2019). Reasoning processes in clinical reasoning: from the perspective of cognitive psychology. Korean Journal of Medical Education, 31 (4), 299-308.

https://doi.org/10.3946/kjme.2019.140

 

Valentine, J.L., Sekula, K., Lynch (2020) Evolution of forensic theory- introduction of the constructed theory of forensic nursing care: A Middle-Range Theory. Journal of Forensic Nursing

Valentine_May2020_Evolution_of_Forensic_Nursing_Theory.pdf (researchgate.net)

Understanding deductive and inductive reasoning is essential in research as it assists in making inferences and drawing conclusions. In inductive reasoning conclusions are drawn from observations. The greater the data, the higher the probability that the conclusion will be true. Observations will not always lead to the correct generalized conclusion. Stephens et al. (2020) guided participants in a study on this type of reasoning by asking them to judge if the conclusion was plausible based on the premises. It is described as the bottom-up approach, also known as the specific to general approach. Steps in inductive reasoning include1. Observation 2. Analysis 3. Theory. Compared to deductive reasoning, this uses facts and theories to arrive to the conclusion. It is a method of verification and, in some cases does not often give new knowledge, but the results can be seen as beneficial. It is identified as the top-down approach. Simple steps to this process are 1. Idea or theory 2. Observation 3. Conclusion. In this case, the premise is known to be true, and we make a conclusion about something specific.

The chosen theory to guide the DNP project in week one was the Theory of Comfort by Kolcaba. It is specific to the comfort needs of individuals and their families which creates an experience. The three concepts it is based on are relief, ease, and transcendence (Barreto et al., 2020). This model of care is a resource for engaging in comforting interventions. The inductive approach, compared to deductive reasoning, is used in this theory as it uses data to draw conclusions. It is a tool used to analyze patients in a particular setting. After observations are made the goal is to increase patient comfort, which is done with the inclusion of four domains which include physical, psychospiritual, environment, and sociocultural aspects (Barreto et al., 2020). Barreto et al. (2020) study provided an example of inductive reasoning. It observed elderly patients in the intensive care unit. It identified that nursing diagnoses corresponded to the patients but concluded that it did not guarantee comfort care. Therefore, the study made further recommendations that this is a theory that can be implemented to meet the needs.

 

Reference:

Barreto Cardoso, R., Alfradique de Souza, P., Pereira Caldas, C., & Ribeiro Bitencourt, G. (2020). Nursing diagnoses in hospitalized elderly patients based on Kolcaba’s Comfort Theory. Revista de Enfermagem Referência, 4, 1–9. https://doi.org/10.12707/RV20066

 

Stephens, R. G., Dunn, J. C., Hayes, B. K., & Kalish, M. L. (2020). A test of two processes: The effect of training on deductive and inductive reasoning. Cognition199. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2020.104223

Deductive reasoning is also called deductive logic, this  process describes  reasoning from one or more general statements regarding what is known to reach a logically certain conclusion. On the other hand, inductive reasoning, better known as  induction or bottom-up logic. This concept constructs or evaluates general propositions that are derived from specific examples. Arguments in deductive logic are either valid or invalid. Invalid arguments are always unsound. Valid arguments are sound only if the premises they are based upon are true. Arguments in inductive reasoning are either strong or weak. Weak arguments are always uncogent. Strong arguments are cogent only if the premises they are based upon are true. Shin (2019), explains that A number of researchers across different fields have used inductive and deductive approaches as reasoning processes to solve complex problems or complete tasks. This has been used in research to achieve greater understanding.

Virginia Henderson’s theory, Need Based, which is derived from the Principles and Practice of Nursing is a grand theory that focuses on nursing care and activities of daily living. According to Henderson (2021), Reasoning is important in the decision making process.  When we are to decide on which care each individual patient needs and when to do them to be most effective, reasoning must be employed.  An example for deductive reasoning is based on conclusions drawn with certain patients. Alcoholic patients vomiting fresh blood have esophageal ruptures, that’s a general thought. The patient who vomited fresh blood is an alcoholic, that’s more specific. Because the patient vomited fresh blood and those patients vomit fresh blood have esophageal ruptures this patient also has ruptured esophageal varices. Examples for inductive reasoning surround probable conclusions. Alcoholic patient A who vomited fresh blood is known for having esophageal ruptures. Therefore, alcoholic patients who vomit fresh blood have esophageal ruptures. This is not fact, just assumptive conclusions.

 

Henderson, L. (2021). Higher-order evidence and losing one’s conviction. Noûs. 2021; 1– 17. https://doi.org/10.1111/nous.12367

 

Shin H. S. (2019). Reasoning processes in clinical reasoning: from the perspective of cognitive psychology. Korean journal of medical education31(4), 299–308. https://doi.org/10.3946/kjme.2019.140