ENGL 147N Pro-Position Paper

ENGL 147N Pro-Position Paper

ENGL 147N Pro-Position Paper

Vaccination in China

It is a fact that the world is filled with deadly and dangerous diseases, and societies of all countries are trying to find the cure, to prevent illnesses and deaths of citizens. Vaccinations are one of the ways that fight viruses before they endanger nations, stopping pandemics and epidemics prior to them reaching critical levels. However, China, being one of the most populated countries in the world is not doing everything to prevent the spread of several types of influenzas, which raises concern on an international level. Without timely introduction of vaccines on the national level, disease in China will most certainly become a global problem.

Context

Vaccinations, introduced before the spread of disease, have been shown highly effective. An article titled, To save children’s lives, China should adopt an initiative to speed introduction of pneumonia vaccines, raises an important point that “vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b” have been proven effective and are used globally. However, China still has not changed national policy to make such vaccinations available (Yu, Yang & Varma, 2012). The World Health Organization and many other countries in the world have recommended this initiative, since worldwide, child mortality because of these diseases has greatly decreased, while in China, death rates are still high and nothing is being done to introduce the vaccines.

1st Pro-Point

World organizations have come together to do everything possible to aid China. Global community has decided that “…countries with a gross national income of less than US$1,000 per person”, will receive the medicine for free, but even after such an action by the GAVI Alliance, there was still little action to implement this vaccine nationally (Yu, Yang & Varma, 2012). The authors of the article present evidence that this vaccination is crucial for China’s health, especially since the population of the country is so great in comparison to the rest of the world. A great percentage of children are born in China yearly, and without these vaccines, many children are at risk.

2st Pro-Point

The data which describes the danger of the lack of vaccination does exist for further analysis. An absolutely worrying statistic is provided in the article where “China accounted for 21 million…of the world’s 156 million new pneumonia cases each year” (Yu, Yang & Varma, 2012). It would seem this is a reason enough for the government to take drastic steps towards changing medical policies. An article written at a later date, 2016, titled Seasonal influenza vaccination in China: Landscape of diverse regional reimbursement policy, and budget impact analysis, supports the lack of action. Even though there is a change in local administration, and some people are being vaccinated, it is not on a national level (Yang, et al). As such, vaccinations are necessary, and must be provided to the whole population, not only select groups.

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3st Pro-Point

            Without an immediate implementation of the vaccine in China, air-born diseases will spread at an even faster

ENGL 147N Pro-Position Paper
ENGL 147N Pro-Position Paper

rate. Yu, et al., in an article titled Characterization of regional influenza seasonality patterns in China and implications for vaccination strategies: Spatio-temporal modeling of surveillance data, provide the details outlining periodicity, duration, as well as present predictions and outcomes which point to the problem of lack of vaccinations. The information on how and for what reason to act already exists, so all this evidence is enough to prove that vaccines in China are greatly needed. The problems that can be seen in the world today are proof that vaccinations could have played one of the major roles in preventing the spread of several types of influenzas.

Conclusion

It is clear that there were and are numerous statistics, and data which support the benefits of vaccinations. China, and other countries, must get prepared and start changing policies as soon as possible. Preventing diseases and the spread of viruses is critical, as it makes people ready for what is coming. The worst is being unprepared, falsely thinking that everything is calm and technology will save people. All this evidence is enough to prove that vaccines in China are greatly needed.

 

References

Yang, et al. (2016). Seasonal influenza vaccination in China: Landscape of diverse regional reimbursement policy, and budget impact analysis. Elsevier 34(47), 5724-5735.

Yu, H. et al. (2013). Characterization of regional influenza seasonality patterns in China and implications for vaccination strategies: Spatio-temporal modeling of surveillance data. PLOS Medicine, 10(11), 1-16.

Yu, H., Yang, W. & Varma, J. (2012). To save children’s lives, China should adopt an initiative to speed introduction of pneumonia vaccines. HEALTH AFFAIRS 31(11).