HCA 645 Refer to “Impact of Small Nuclear Weapons on Washington, DC: Outcomes and Emergency Response Recommendation” in your assigned readings

HCA 645 Refer to “Impact of Small Nuclear Weapons on Washington, DC: Outcomes and Emergency Response Recommendation” in your assigned readings

HCA 645 Refer to “Impact of Small Nuclear Weapons on Washington, DC: Outcomes and Emergency Response Recommendation” in your assigned readings

In Georgia what are Georgia’s Casualty estimates in nuclear emergency response.

Estimated casualties from nuclear detonation modeling for trauma only, radiation only injury, and combined injury (radiation plus trauma). Unshielded persons would receive large enough radiation doses to cause death from radiation illness within two months (Von Hippel, 1983). Population density of this area is 200 persons per square kilometer, with one populated place per four square kilometers. Additional targeting difficulties would flow from the fact that roads naturally pass through these cities, towns, and villages and therefore so would many of the military units that would be the targets of battlefield nuclear weapons. In many cases, the roads between towns would be crowded with refugees. Finally, attacking military forces might use urban and refugee “hugging” tactics so as to discourage the use of battlefield nuclear weapons against themselves (Bracken, 1979).

 

The critical need for public information campaigns for mass casualty response.

Interim Staff Guidance Emergency Planning Exemption Requests for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants. Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Nuclear Power Reactors,” describes acceptable methods for implementing the regulations. Guidance on Making Changes to Emergency Plans for Nuclear Power Reactors. Planning Basis for the Development of State and Local Government Radiological Emergency Response Plans in Support of Light Water Nuclear Power Plants. Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plant, Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants – Criteria for Utility Offsite Planning and Preparedness. Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants – Criteria for Emergency Planning in an Early Site Permit Application. Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants – Guidance for Protective Action Strategies. Functional Criteria for Emergency Response Facilities. Clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements – Requirements for Emergency Response Capability. Methodology for Evaluation of Emergency Response Facilities. Guidance for Assessing Exemption Requests from the Nuclear Power Plant Licensed Operator Staffing Requirements Specified in 10 CFR 50.54(m). State of the Art in Evacuation Time Estimate Studies for Nuclear Power Plants. Development of Evacuation Time Estimate Studies for Nuclear Power Plants. Identification and Analysis of Factors Affecting Emergency Evacuations. Review of NUREG-0654, Supplement 3, ‘Criteria for Protective Action Recommendations for Severe Accidents.

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Immediate monitoring of nuclear attack patients as part of internally displaced population.

  • Quickly assess the situation.
  • Consider if you can get out of the area or if it would be better to go inside a building to limit the amount of radioactive material you are exposed to.
  • If you take shelter, go as far below ground as possible, close windows and doors, turn off air conditioners, heaters or other ventilation systems.
  • Stay where you are, watch TV, listen to the radio, or check the Internet for official news as it becomes available.
  • To limit the amount of radiation you are exposed to, think about shielding, distance and tim
    • Shielding:If you have a thick shield between yourself and the radioactive materials more of the radiation will be absorbed, and you will be exposed to less.
    • Distance:The farther away you are away from the blast and fallout, the lower your exposure.
    • Time:Minimizing time spent exposed will also reduce your risk.
  • Use available information to assess the situation. If there is a significant radiation threat, health care authorities may or may not advise you to take potassium iodide.
  • Potassium iodide is the same matter added to your table salt to make it iodized. It can help block radioactive iodine from being absorbed by the thyroid gland, protecting this gland from radiation injury.

 

References

 

Von Hippel, F., 1983: The Effects of Nuclear War, in Physics, Technology and the Arms Race (D.W. Hafemeister and D. Schroeer, eds.), pp.1-46, American Institute of Physics, New York, NY.64

 

Bracken, P., 1979: On theater warfare, Hudson Institute, Report #HI-3036-P, Croton-on-Hudson, NY. Bracken, P., 1983

 

SAMPLE RESPONSE

Your post was very informative.  it would appear you love in Georgia.  The highway system there is very complex.

HCA 645 Refer to Impact of Small Nuclear Weapons on Washington, DC Outcomes and Emergency Response Recommendation  in your assigned readings
HCA 645 Refer to Impact of Small Nuclear Weapons on Washington, DC Outcomes and Emergency Response Recommendation in your assigned readings

Does your state currently employ an evacuation route inland or is it just coastal? I live just south of you in Florida and our evacuation routes are 75 N, the Turnpike N, and 95 N.  But then we already deal with that issue during hurricane season.  People in central and northern Florida flood into your state, causing even more congestion on your highway system.

I think that for any state this could be a problem. Careful planning of evacuation routes, contingency routes included in that, should always take place.  it would appear, depending on the type of blast, that many people could seek shelter in your larger buildings in ATL.  They are concrete construction and provide basement levels.

Based on the readings the main issue is distance from the blast, and time.  Being far enough away to not be affected by the initial blast could save some lives, but there is always the issue of fallout with nuclear waste.  This can pose a problem for some time. Bioterrorism is another issue all together.  It is an issue of containing an airborne attack of an organism which can be difficult.  I mean look at how the flu spreads even with vaccinations being available.  Imagine an organism that there is no vaccine for and maybe no current line of effective treatment.  The Ebola spread in western central Africa about five years ago comes to mind.  We were preparing for the potential spread of it here.  It was daunting.

We can prepare for all of this as much as we want, but the best defense to me is maintaining a good relationship with nations that could potentially launch an attack.

In Georgia what are Georgia’s Casualty estimates in nuclear emergency response.

Estimated casualties from nuclear detonation modeling for trauma only, radiation only injury, and combined injury (radiation plus trauma). Unshielded persons would receive large enough radiation doses to cause death from radiation illness within two months (Von Hippel, 1983). Population density of this area is 200 persons per square kilometer, with one populated place per four square kilometers. Additional targeting difficulties would flow from the fact that roads naturally pass through these cities, towns, and villages and therefore so would many of the military units that would be the targets of battlefield nuclear weapons. In many cases, the roads between towns would be crowded with refugees. Finally, attacking military forces might use urban and refugee “hugging” tactics so as to discourage the use of battlefield nuclear weapons against themselves (Bracken, 1979).

 

The critical need for public information campaigns for mass casualty response.

Interim Staff Guidance Emergency Planning Exemption Requests for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants. Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Nuclear Power Reactors,” describes acceptable methods for implementing the regulations. Guidance on Making Changes to Emergency Plans for Nuclear Power Reactors. Planning Basis for the Development of State and Local Government Radiological Emergency Response Plans in Support of Light Water Nuclear Power Plants. Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plant, Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants – Criteria for Utility Offsite Planning and Preparedness. Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants – Criteria for Emergency Planning in an Early Site Permit Application. Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants – Guidance for Protective Action Strategies. Functional Criteria for Emergency Response Facilities. Clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements – Requirements for Emergency Response Capability. Methodology for Evaluation of Emergency Response Facilities. Guidance for Assessing Exemption Requests from the Nuclear Power Plant Licensed Operator Staffing Requirements Specified in 10 CFR 50.54(m). State of the Art in Evacuation Time Estimate Studies for Nuclear Power Plants. Development of Evacuation Time Estimate Studies for Nuclear Power Plants. Identification and Analysis of Factors Affecting Emergency Evacuations. Review of NUREG-0654, Supplement 3, ‘Criteria for Protective Action Recommendations for Severe Accidents.

 

Immediate monitoring of nuclear attack patients as part of internally displaced population.

  • Quickly assess the situation.
  • Consider if you can get out of the area or if it would be better to go inside a building to limit the amount of radioactive material you are exposed to.
  • If you take shelter, go as far below ground as possible, close windows and doors, turn off air conditioners, heaters or other ventilation systems.
  • Stay where you are, watch TV, listen to the radio, or check the Internet for official news as it becomes available.
  • To limit the amount of radiation you are exposed to, think about shielding, distance and tim
    • Shielding:If you have a thick shield between yourself and the radioactive materials more of the radiation will be absorbed, and you will be exposed to less.
    • Distance:The farther away you are away from the blast and fallout, the lower your exposure.
    • Time:Minimizing time spent exposed will also reduce your risk.
  • Use available information to assess the situation. If there is a significant radiation threat, health care authorities may or may not advise you to take potassium iodide.
  • Potassium iodide is the same matter added to your table salt to make it iodized. It can help block radioactive iodine from being absorbed by the thyroid gland, protecting this gland from radiation injury.

 

References

 

Von Hippel, F., 1983: The Effects of Nuclear War, in Physics, Technology and the Arms Race (D.W. Hafemeister and D. Schroeer, eds.), pp.1-46, American Institute of Physics, New York, NY.64

 

Bracken, P., 1979: On theater warfare, Hudson Institute, Report #HI-3036-P, Croton-on-Hudson, NY. Bracken, P., 1983

 

SAMPLE RESPONSE

 

Your post was very informative.  it would appear you love in Georgia.  The highway system there is very complex. Does your state currently employ an evacuation route inland or is it just coastal? I live just south of you in Florida and our evacuation routes are 75 N, the Turnpike N, and 95 N.  But then we already deal with that issue during hurricane season.  People in central and northern Florida flood into your state, causing even more congestion on your highway system.

I think that for any state this could be a problem. Careful planning of evacuation routes, contingency routes included in that, should always take place.  it would appear, depending on the type of blast, that many people could seek shelter in your larger buildings in ATL.  They are concrete construction and provide basement levels.

Based on the readings the main issue is distance from the blast, and time.  Being far enough away to not be affected by the initial blast could save some lives, but there is always the issue of fallout with nuclear waste.  This can pose a problem for some time. Bioterrorism is another issue all together.  It is an issue of containing an airborne attack of an organism which can be difficult.  I mean look at how the flu spreads even with vaccinations being available.  Imagine an organism that there is no vaccine for and maybe no current line of effective treatment.  The Ebola spread in western central Africa about five years ago comes to mind.  We were preparing for the potential spread of it here.  It was daunting.

We can prepare for all of this as much as we want, but the best defense to me is maintaining a good relationship with nations that could potentially launch an attack.