HLT 362 Using the research article selected for DQ 1, identify three key questions you will ask and answer when reading the research study and why these questions are important

HLT 362 Using the research article selected for DQ 1, identify three key questions you will ask and answer when reading the research study and why these questions are important

HLT 362 Using the research article selected for DQ 1, identify three key questions you will ask and answer when reading the research study and why these questions are important

Research Questions

The research questions are the first active step in the research project. In general, there are three types of research questions: Descriptive, Observational-Relational, and Causal questions. The descriptive question describes conditions that are happening or characteristics that exist. An observational-relational question examines the question of whether two or more variables affect, or do not affect, each other under a given set of circumstances. The causal question attempts to determine if changing one variable in a known and/or contained habitat has a measurable effect on another variable or set of variables within that same area or habitat.

Three key questions I will ask and why these questions are important

What other studies have been done on the same matter?

This is important to know because there is a probability that a single study will not provide a definitive answer or the expected data. And if there is any controversial area it is important to clarify that with multiple studies.

How well did the study address causation?

The cross-sectional study design is limited to making inferences about correlations rather than causation and does not determine cause and effect. For example, the article I picked reported results that identify the impact of SIgAD on patients with DM1 but not the cause and effect.

How are the study’s results are evaluated?

Evaluating results is important because provides information to other researchers so they can repeat the study and verify and confirm results.

I think these are all relevant questions that need to be asked when considering a study. Additionally, it is also

HLT 362 Using the research article selected for DQ 1, identify three key questions you will ask and answer when reading the research study and why these questions are important
HLT 362 Using the research article selected for DQ 1, identify three key questions you will ask and answer when reading the research study and why these questions are important

important to consider the sample size of the study. How many participants were included in the study? Are the results reliable and generalizable? Additionally, what type of data was collected? Was it quantitative or qualitative data? This is important to know because some studies may be conducted using only interviews or surveys, which can lead to issues such as bias or lack of reliability. Finally, it is also important to consider the context in which the study was conducted. What kind of environment or conditions were the participants in during the study? All of these questions can have an impact on the validity of the study.

References

Davies, J. (2020). What Is a Cross-Sectional Study?. Retrieved from https://www.verywellmind.com/cross-sectional-study-2795366

Hagan, K. (2020). Qualitative Data vs. Quantitative Data: What’s the Difference?. Retrieved from https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/qualitative-vs-quantitative-data

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it is great that you are interested in the strategy used to collect data in healthcare in order to better prioritize patient care. There are a few different strategies used in healthcare to collect data. According to a 2020 study published by the Journal of Nursing and Healthcare of Chronic Diseases, data collection in healthcare often involves patient medical records, patient history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies (Abbaszadeh & Khodadoost, 2020). Additionally, a 2020 study published in Nursing and Healthcare Perspectives found that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) can be used to collect data on patient experience and patient-reported outcomes (Wang et al., 2020). Do I feel as if the strategy used to collect the data is accurate? Overall, accuracy of data collection in healthcare depends on the data collection instrument used and the accuracy of the data collected. Effective data collection strategies often involve valid and reliable instruments and data collection processes that are appropriate for the population being studied (Abbaszadeh & Khodadoost, 2020). If the strategy was not accurate, there are a few different things that could be done to make it accurate. For example, healthcare providers could use standardized data collection instruments, focus on data quality, and ensure that data is collected from a representative sample of the population being studied (Wang et al., 2020).

References

Abbaszadeh, M., & Khodadoost, M. (2020). Data collection in healthcare: Challenges, strategies, and techniques. Journal of Nursing and Healthcare of Chronic Diseases, 3(2), 117–127. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nhcd.2020.05.004 Wang, D. D., Fonseca, J. C., Rose, B. N., & Zhang, X. (2020). Patient-reported outcomes in healthcare: Measurement and data collection. Nursing and Healthcare Perspectives, 3(2), 99–102. https://doi.org/10.15761/NHCP.1000233

Objectives of social media use

The most common intended use of social media was for caregiver satisfaction (n = 9, 29%). Most studies that examined caregiver satisfaction used communication platforms (n = 8/9). Social networking sites were often used to improve self-care (n = 2/6, 30%), and content communities were mainly intended to improve patient safety (n = 2/4, 50%). There were few studies that addressed clinical decision-making (n = 4, 13%) and half (n = 2/4) used content communities. Five studies (16%) did not fit the framework, and were classified as “other”; three of these studies reported the prevalence of social networking use (n = 1) or of internet use more broadly (n = 2), and two compared mothers and fathers use of information and communication technology (n = 1) or frequency and length of webcam viewing (n = 1).

Outcomes and measures

Usage feasibility and patient and caregiver experience outcomes were most commonly reported (n = 30 and n = 23, respectively) . Patient and caregiver knowledge outcomes were reported in 16 studies (52%), and use of services and cost products, and health behaviors and health status outcomes were reported in eight studies each. Among effects related to usage feasibility (n = 30), measures of usage and demographics were most common (n = 22, 73%) and were often accompanied by estimates of users’ attitudes and preferences (n = 20, 67%). Standards of patient or caregiver satisfaction or of clinician-patient/caregiver communication were most commonly reported for outcomes related to patient and caregiver experience (n = 13 and n = 12, respectively). provides a summary of developments as they relate to the study objectives. There were no defining trends between outcomes with regard to objectives for social media use, but measures associated with goals the use of services and cost, or to health behaviors and health status, were generally least reported among any objective. One study reported outcomes related to potential for unintended consequences or harm from social media tools.

Moorhead SA, Hazlett DE, Harrison L, Carroll JK, Irwin A, Hoving C. A new dimension of health care: systematic review of the uses, benefits, and limitations of social media for health communication. J Med Internet Res.

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A question I would be interested in asking for the article you chose would be which departments were included in the sample population of the study. While I have no doubt there are risks for injuries in every nursing specialty, a study this broad could be easily skewed to look like certain injuries are more common than others simply because there are more nurses from that specialty participating in the study. In order to get an accurate picture, a more stratified sample that included all specialties or perhaps limiting the study to investigate injuries in one setting such as a hospital or long-term care facility could also prove insightful (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018).

Reference

 

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2018, November). Occupational injuries and illnesses among registered nurses : Monthly Labor Review: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved February 9, 2023, from https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2018/article/occupational-injuries-and-illnesses-among-registered-nurses.htm