LDR 615 What types of obstacles/objections do leaders face from stakeholders when implementing change within an organization?

LDR 615 What types of obstacles/objections do leaders face from stakeholders when implementing change within an organization?

LDR 615 What types of obstacles/objections do leaders face from stakeholders when implementing change within an organization?

There are various types of obstacles/objections that leaders might face from stakeholders when implementing within an organization. The first type of obstacle is individual change resistance. Some individual stakeholders prefer the status quo. As such they cannot easily admit changes. They are threatened by changes no matter how promising or logical changes are, leading to resistance to change (DuBose & Mayo, 2020). The second type of obstacle is organizational resistance. Stakeholders are likely to oppose changes that touch on inherent organizational factors such as culture, structure, and power dynamics. For instance, when the proposed change threatens the norms, values, and culture of the organization, some stakeholders are likely to resist such change (DuBose & Mayo, 2020). The other obstacle is group-level resistance to change. This obstacle occurs when a group of stakeholders come together and voice their concerns about the proposed change in an organized manner. The common actions of the group are serious threats to the proposed change. Examples of group-level resistance include staff associations or unions.  Lack of communication is also an obstacle to change implementation (Wu et al., 2020). Usually, the biggest reason for the failure of change implementation is the absence of clear and consistent communication.

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Leaders can use various strategies to work with stakeholders, remove obstacles, and address objections to

LDR 615 What types of obstacles objections do leaders face from stakeholders when implementing change within an organization
LDR 615 What types of obstacles objections do leaders face from stakeholders when implementing change within an organization

change implementation. The first strategy is to address poor communication. One of the most effective aspects of stakeholders’ management is capturing their expectations and project objectives. Ensuring effective communication during the process of change implementation is crucial in clarifying what is expected from stakeholders, performance criteria, and any additional insight into what is needed for the success of the project (Wu et al., 2020). This is essential in helping stakeholders to own the project. The other strategy is to recognize the stakeholders and watch them closely. After the identification, it is crucial to find out what motivates them. Usually, there are various categories of stakeholders, with differing interests, agendas, and goals. Leaders should recognize and grade their influence and interest to keep the continuity of the project and avoid being pulled in different directions (Lewis & Sahay, 2019). When addressing group-level resistance, it is vital to negotiate with leaders of staff unions or associations.

References

DuBose, B. M., & Mayo, A. M. (2020). Resistance to change: A concept analysis. In Nursing Forum (Vol. 55, No. 4, pp. 631-636). https://doi.org/10.1111/nuf.12479

Lewis, L., & Sahay, S. (2019). Change and change management. In Movements in Organizational Communication Research (pp. 214-232). Routledge.

Wu, Y., Guimaraes, A., & Wang, Z. (2020). Product owners at Hesburgh Libraries: Increasing stakeholder engagement and accountability through continuous organizational enhancement. Journal of Library Administration, 60(7), 695-713. https://doi.org/10.1080/01930826.2020.1797329

As a manager instituting change or partnering with my staff to institute change, I
could not agree with you more that confusion is one of the largest complaints I

hear. When I am formulating a plan, I try to run through it many times to ensure it is
clear, yet once the process is implemented, there is always questions.  This is an
area as a manager I previously have become defensive as I thought I had planned it
well and clearly, to find out it was not to those that are implementing the
change. Partnering with staff to help incorporate change is a powerful tool a leader
can use, to ensure clarity and that all the seeps are covered. In the times of COVID
change was being implemented at an unprecedented rate and partnering with my
unit-based council was the key to receive feedback from staff, answer questions,
help dispel fears and myths. A leader must check in often, be open to adapting,
have a listening heart and willingness to understand the feelings of fear and
uncertainty to be successful in any change (Kotter & Cohen, 2002).
Kotter, J. P., & Cohen, D. S. (2002). The heart of change real-life stories of how
people change their organizations [e-book].

Harvard Business Review Press
https://doi.org/https://bibliu.com/app/#/view/books/9781422187340/epub/OEBPS/T
ext/02_Title_Pa.html#

As a manager instituting change or partnering with my staff to institute change, I
could not agree with you more that confusion is one of the largest complaints I
hear. When I am formulating a plan, I try to run through it many times to ensure it is
clear, yet once the process is implemented, there is always questions.  This is an
area as a manager I previously have become defensive as I thought I had planned it
well and clearly, to find out it was not to those that are implementing the
change. Partnering with staff to help incorporate change is a powerful tool a leader
can use, to ensure clarity and that all the seeps are covered. In the times of COVID
change was being implemented at an unprecedented rate and partnering with my
unit-based council was the key to receive feedback from staff, answer questions,
help dispel fears and myths. A leader must check in often, be open to adapting,

have a listening heart and willingness to understand the feelings of fear and
uncertainty to be successful in any change (Kotter & Cohen, 2002).
Kotter, J. P., & Cohen, D. S. (2002). The heart of change real-life stories of how
people change their organizations [e-book]. Harvard Business Review Press
https://doi.org/

https://bibliu.com/app/#/view/books/9781422187340/epub/OEBPS/T
ext/02_Title_Pa.html#