NR 393 Reflection on 19th and 20th Century Nursing

NR 393 Reflection on 19th and 20th Century Nursing

NR 393 Reflection on 19th and 20th Century Nursing

The 19th and 20th century introduced several changes in healthcare to accelerate the profession of nursing. Nurses found themselves in new roles in the midst of war. Advances in practice with medications, equipment, and research also influenced the role of the nurse. It was a time when females were entering society as a workforce, no longer restricted to the boundaries of activities occurring in their home. Socioeconomic influences also helped shape nursing in the early 20th century. There are several examples of changes in this week’s reading.

Class, as you consider this week’s topic, reflect on the nurses in the 19th and 20th centuries who will best guide your current nursing practice. Provide an explanation of why you made this choice.

I think it was interesting you chose to write about Clara Barton for this weeks discussion because who better to talk about during a pandemic than a nurse who is known for disaster preparedness and emergency public training. Although she mainly was dealing with war, this pandemic has proved to be an emergency situation in society as well which as you are an ER nurse definitely can relate to. I work inpatient sometimes COVID sometimes non-COVID but you are correct that the burnout is real right now with everything happening in the world and our jobs. I agree with what you said that reading about past nursing heroes is great motivation to keep going because it proves that disasters have happened before and the world overcame them so this is no different and we will persevere and get through this pandemic!

I thought that Barton was a great example. Working in the ER and the Covid unit of the ER during this pandemic almost seems like war like conditions. We have limited beds for the covid patients in the ER, we have to decide who needs seen first, who can sit and wait in the covid waiting area. It is hard to be a nurse in any areas of nursing right now, burnout is real. But the quote you choose for this time is right on point to be encouraging for this pandemic times. During this time of the pandemic hopefully we will learn better practices and modern treatments for these patients to decrease stress on the patients and the staff caring for patients.

Out of all of these nurses, I have to pick Clara Barton given my current situation to reflect upon. I lost my apartment due to a fire. Thanks to Clara Barton creating the American Red Cross, I was able to use some of their services almost immediately.

The Red Cross is a huge organization. I had a fire which displaced my family. I was provided a two night hotel stay, a

NR 393 Reflection on 19th and 20th Century Nursing
NR 393 Reflection on 19th and 20th Century Nursing

debit card for immediate use for food and clothing if needed, a mental health counselor who checked on each of my family members, a nurse who would help with replacing medications and medical equipment. They also had a case worker who sent links for housing opportunities. Due to this situation and how quickly they provided assistance, I would like to give my time to the Red Cross as well as a volunteer nurse.

The founding of the Red Cross has helped my family in our time of disaster/need.

I also want to reflect on Mary Mahoney as she brought diversity to nursing. I cannot imagine anything other than diversity in health care. I have always enjoyed befriending and working with people who bring variety in experience and culture to the table. I thank her for her resilience back when she was told she was too dark skinned to help wounded soldiers alongside Florence and made it work anyway! Had she not been so bold, I wonder what nursing would look like today.

Nurse Richards also makes me thankful for including men and women alike in nursing – everyone is needed in nursing and discrimination is unhelpful and disgusting.

I am so sorry to hear about your apartment fire and how it impacted you and your family. That is great that you want to give back and volunteer with the American Red Cross. I didn’t realize all the things American Red Cross does for the community. Diversity is big in nursing and it’s great to see people with different cultural backgrounds going into nursing and even learning different religions from patients. It’s also great to see more men going into nursing, back in Nightingales time nurses were only thought to be women and now we have many men that go into nursing.

The nurses from the 20th century will best guide my professional practices because their moral behavior was satisfactory to both the patients and the management. Nurses in the 19th century were lower class level women who were not trained and gave themselves the head nurses’ position and put themselves in charge of the critical patients (Helmstadter, 2008). They lacked moral character, such as being kind to the patients. The nurses are paid a full salary without work experience, but they involved themselves with some less critical nursing care such as making beds, cleaning the weaker patients, and helping them. The nurses had to find and pay substitutes by themselves because they had no paid time off.

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The 20th-century nurses were well trained, came from the middle class, were highly disciplined, made sure they had well attended to their patients, did their work with passion, kind to their patients, humbly communicated them, and used the correct language to their patients (Amadeo, 2008). They have trained matrons who are maintaining adequate discipline and see them providing exemplary patient care. Nurses in the 20th century are kind where they are mindful. They are in the position to listen to their patients, encourage them, be respectful even when faced with demanding patients, and deal with patients’ fearful or anxious feelings.
Nurses should develop self-awareness, which is beneficial to their professional level and personal. Mindful awareness includes their unsolved emotional stress, mainly through conscious awareness. However, many nurses have difficulty dealing with dying patients, witnessing patients suffer, and their families. It will improve the relationship between the patients and nurses.

References

Amadeo, C. A. (2008). A correlational study of servant leadership and registered nurse job satisfaction in acute health-care settings (Doctoral dissertation, University of Phoenix).
Helmstadter, C. (2008). Authority and leadership: The evolution of nursing management in 19th century teaching hospitals. (n.d.). Journal of Nursing Management 16, 4–13

The nurses from the 20th century will best guide my professional practices because their moral behavior was satisfactory to both the patients and the management. Nurses in the 19th century were lower class level women who were not trained and gave themselves the head nurses’ position and put themselves in charge of the critical patients (Helmstadter, 2008). They lacked moral character, such as being kind to the patients. The nurses are paid a full salary without work experience, but they involved themselves with some less critical nursing care such as making beds, cleaning the weaker patients, and helping them. The nurses had to find and pay substitutes by themselves because they had no paid time off.
The 20th-century nurses were well trained, came from the middle class, were highly disciplined, made sure they had well attended to their patients, did their work with passion, kind to their patients, humbly communicated them, and used the correct language to their patients (Amadeo, 2008). They have trained matrons who are maintaining adequate discipline and see them providing exemplary patient care. Nurses in the 20th century are kind where they are mindful. They are in the position to listen to their patients, encourage them, be respectful even when faced with demanding patients, and deal with patients’ fearful or anxious feelings.
Nurses should develop self-awareness, which is beneficial to their professional level and personal. Mindful awareness includes their unsolved emotional stress, mainly through conscious awareness. However, many nurses have difficulty dealing with dying patients, witnessing patients suffer, and their families. It will improve the relationship between the patients and nurses.

References

Amadeo, C. A. (2008). A correlational study of servant leadership and registered nurse job satisfaction in acute health-care settings (Doctoral dissertation, University of Phoenix).
Helmstadter, C. (2008). Authority and leadership: The evolution of nursing management in 19th century teaching hospitals. (n.d.). Journal of Nursing Management 16, 4–13