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NRS 429 Compare and contrast the three different levels of health promotion (primary, secondary, tertiary). - Writing Professors
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NRS 429 Compare and contrast the three different levels of health promotion (primary, secondary, tertiary).

NRS 429 Compare and contrast the three different levels of health promotion (primary, secondary, tertiary).

NRS 429 Compare and contrast the three different levels of health promotion (primary, secondary, tertiary).

Primary promotion is considered prevention before the illness or injury usually has occurred it can be in the form of vaccinations or routine check-ups and technically takes place in the primary care centers and clinics. Primary prevention can also include educational interventions, also lifestyle factors like healthy eating habits and proper sleep, and better nutritional habits.

Secondary promotion is when you focus on early detection and treatment of disease and catch them before they progress into a irreversible state, an example could be catching and treatment of early stage cancer by of prevention screenings like mammograms and general health screening. If caught early certain type of cancers if caught and treated early can have a positive outlook and better outcomes for the patient.

Tertiary promotion is when a disease has already caused permanent damage and the goal of tertiary care is to get the patient to a level of functioning so that they can go back home or in a rehabilitation facility or in between such as home health care services to address any side effects that may arise from ongoing treatment of their disease. The goal is to help the patient try to get back to their baseline as much as possible so that they can be as independent as possible.

The education needs of the patient for all three levels of health promotion start with the fact that you have to be willing to accept the teaching methods and a huge is participating in their own care as much as they are able to as this will greatly help in education and learning about the diseases process.

 

Falkner, A., Grand Canyon University (Ed). (2018). Health promotion: Health & wellness across the continuum. Retrieved from https://lc.gcumedia.com/nrs429vn/health-promotion-health-and-wellness-across-the-continuum/v1.1/

Health promotion is process of empowering people to increase control over their health and its determinants through health literacy efforts and multisectoral action to increase healthy behaviors. This process includes activities for the community-at-large or for populations at increased risk of negative health outcomes. Health promotion usually addresses behavioral risk factors such as tobacco use, obesity, diet and physical inactivity, as well as the areas of mental health, injury prevention, drug abuse control, alcohol control, health behavior related to HIV, and sexual health.

Disease prevention and health promotion share many goals, and there is considerable overlap between functions. On a conceptual level, it is useful to characterize disease prevention services as those primarily concentrated within the health care sector, and health promotion services as those that depend on intersectoral actions and or are concerned with the social determinants of health.

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Source: At Work, Issue 80, Spring 2015: Institute for Work & Health, Toronto [This column updates a previous column describing the same term, originally published in 2006.]

The Registered Nurse should be prepared with an understanding of the three levels of health promotion: Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary. The assessments that a nurse performs at each level of health promotion can assist with determining a patient’s current and future needs. (Kumar & Preetha, 2012.)

Primary health promotion takes place at the Primary Care level. This usually takes place in a Primary Care

NRS 429 Compare and contrast the three different levels of health promotion (primary, secondary, tertiary).
NRS 429 Compare and contrast the three different levels of health promotion (primary, secondary, tertiary).

Physician’s office or other primary care setting. Nurses can teach patients about their routine medications and any preventative measures that they can take to improve their overall health status and well-being. Patients can ask questions regarding their health in this setting. Questions should be encouraged and answered in order to ensure the patient has health literacy and is engaged in the process of learning.

Secondary health promotion involves encouraging and performing health screenings, or arranging for follow-up testing for patients. Patients are taught about routine screenings and encouraged not to neglect routine testing. Early detection and treatment has been shown to be key to recovery from many health conditions, including cancers.

Health promotion at the tertiary level requires the nurse to have a broad clinical knowledge base. The nurse must have a good understanding of pathophysiology. Patients can be taught how to manage their disease or condition, and how to prevent further decline. For example, a Diabetic who has had multiple fluctuations in blood sugar, with extremely high readings and extremely low blood sugar levels, can be taught to manage the blood glucose level better and prevent further organ and tissue damage.

Levels of prevention can help the nurse to determine educational needs for patients. The nurse can provide anticipatory guidance and evidence-based data at all levels of health promotion and prevention. At the primary care level, the nurse can provide information to prevent the patient from having a crisis and requiring a visit to the Emergency Department. At the secondary level, the nurse can provide screening information, printed materials, and arrange for the screening to take place. The nurse can also teach the importance of follow-up care at this level. A screening is only as good as the follow-through on the test results. At the tertiary level, the patient may need more education and intervention, with the addition of community supports and services to aid in the patient’s recovery. Home Health is one example of a community support that can assist the patient to remain safely in the community. All levels of prevention and health promotion are designed to help the patient to stay out of crisis and out of the hospital setting. (Falkner, 2018.)

References:

  1. Falkner, A., Grand Canyon University (Ed). (2018). Health promotion: Health & wellness across the continuum. Retrieved from https://lc.gcumedia.com/nrs429vn/health-promotion-health-and-wellness-across-the-continuum/v1.1/
  2. Kumar, S., & Preetha, G. (2012). Health promotion: an effective tool for global health. Indian journal of community medicine : official publication of Indian Association of Preventive & Social Medicine37(1), 5–12. https://doi.org/10.4103/0970-0218.94009

Hello

The three levels of health promotion are important for a nurse to understand when educating patients. A nurse should have the knowledge on which level of health promotion will be the most beneficial for a patient to learn. The purpose of primary prevention is to prevent a disease, while secondary prevention focuses on early detection, and tertiary targets the outcome of a disease (Kisling, & Das, 2022). Tertiary prevention are typically implemented in symptomatic patients aimed to reduce the severity of a disease. These levels of prevention are required to deter a disease or complications of a disease.

Reference

Kisling, L, Das, J. (2022). Prevention strategies. National Library of Medicine. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK537222/