NRS 430 Outline the concept of professional accountability as it pertains to nursing

NRS 430 Outline the concept of professional accountability as it pertains to nursing

NRS 430 Outline the concept of professional accountability as it pertains to nursing

Professional accountability is not only holding oneself accountable in the nursing profession, but also holding others accountable professionally. Maintaining professional accountability is staying honest, trustworthy, operating within the nurse’s scope of practice, maintaining patient confidentiality, and upholding the code of “doing no harm” (Green, 2018). I have been practicing at bedside for the past two years and I have encountered a few situations where I had to hold myself professionally accountable, as well as other fellow nurses.

An instance that comes to my mind most recently is, after receiving report from a less experienced nurse who is notorious for cutting corners and leaving work left behind for the second nurse to do, had given me spotty report and neglected to inform me that the patient was on a continuous Heparin drip. As this patient’s labs were scheduled to be drawn at 6am, the patient was a difficult stick and the labs were attempted but not collected. Heparin drips require Q6 blood draws and careful monitoring to ensure the patient stays within the therapeutic range, and the Heparin levels do not become critically high. The nurse giving me report quickly raced through giving me report and grabbed his bag and ran out of the building, without going to bedside with me to evaluate a patient with an oncoming nurse.

I entered the patient’s room directly after the report and found that the Heparin bag was indeed completely empty, and the patient’s labs had not been collected in over 8 hours. I attempted to collect the lab myself to avoid any longer a delay in adjusting Heparin drip and I was unsuccessful myself. I currently work on an organ transplant floor, and I have between 5-6 transplant patients with 20-30 medications per patient, that are all due by 9am and passing these medications is very time sensitive and consuming.

I brought this situation to the attention of my charge nurse, who accelerated it to my nurse manager. At this time the Heparin draw was 10 hours past due and had to be drawn by the nurse manager to avoid any further delay in the process. The doctors had to be contacted regarding the situation as well as the pharmacist who stressed the importance of these critical labs being drawn on time. I had to document the situation in depth to protect my license and I also had to write a patient safety report about the nurse who had given me report and failed to complete his list of tasks to keep the patient safe.

I wouldn’t ever want to get my coworkers in trouble, but this situation could have become dangerous if I didn’t catch the error made by the other nurse, so I had to protect myself and the patient by doing a thorough documentation.

Situations such as these often arise in the nursing profession where a nurse has to hold their fellow nurses professionally accountable when it pertains to patient safety. I was told in nursing school over and over to protect your license because it was so hard to obtain that degree in the first place. Some situations occur in the nursing field that can become uncomfortable for a nurse to hold another nurse or interdisciplinary team member accountable but looking back on the oath taken to “do no harm,” we as the patient primary care giver and advocate, must make those difficult decisions to keep our patients safe.

References

Green, S. (2018). Advancing professional standards. (2nd ed.) Dynamics in Nursing: Art and Science of Professional Practice. Grand Canyon University.

Never before has mental health and self-care been front center of nursing practice. We know from COVID, many are suffering from PTSD after the experiences and dealing with so many deaths. I am looking forward to reading your responses. What is it that you know that you neglect in your self-care and well-being? I know for me, when I take time off from work from my full-time job, I do not truly take the time like it is intended to recharge. I find other things to do or still “work”. I am not good at giving myself downtime. So, I am going to commit to finding at least 15 minutes a day for just a bit of “think about nothing” time. How about you?

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Even though I get my day off, I am still a mother, and I’ll have to take care of the chores in my home. So, I also don’t get the time to actually recharge. Even though I get four days of rest, it goes by so fast in the blink of an eye. Compared to the lockdown, it is less stressful as we now know how to treat them and there’s not a whole lot of patients rushing to the hospital. But I find my time to recharge by hanging out with my family and friends.

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Finding time to take care of you is extremely important to ensure you are able to take care of your family and your patients.

Hello I feel self-care is really important because the Consequences of Not Practicing Self-Care may cause less patience. Increased headaches, stomachaches and other physical symptoms of stress. Difficulty falling and staying asleep. Binge eating or an increase in unhealthy eating habits. I enjoy going to the park watching movies or visiting friends.

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In my own self care, I tend to neglect exercising as frequently as I would like to. It is something that helps my focus

NRS 430 Outline the concept of professional accountability as it pertains to nursing
NRS 430 Outline the concept of professional accountability as it pertains to nursing

and mental health but yet it’s not always prioritized. It is easily missed between work, school, caring for the family etc. On days where I wake up and make sure I get it in it makes a world of difference. I know in the medical field we have a tendency at times to express to our patients the importance of wellness and neglect aspects of our own.

Exercise improves mental health by reducing anxiety, depression, and negative mood and by improving self-esteem and cognitive function (Sherma, et. al, 2006).

Sharma, A., Madaan, V., & Petty, F. D. (2006). Exercise for mental health. Primary care companion to the Journal of clinical psychiatry. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1470658/

Great points regarding exercise and how we do not always make our nurses, as nurses, as priority. We education our patients and then do not follow through for ourselves.

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We often talk about self-care. As nurses, we understand the importance of self-care. We even encourage patients to engage in self-care. However, when it comes to taking our own advice, it seems like that is where we draw the line. Taking time to recharge is important. For instance, there was a time I was taking yoga classes and they used to help me a lot in recharging. Unfortunately, I have a problem with consistently following up on something. I will start yoga classes or jogging sessions and then fizzle out after a few weeks. I am thinking of incorporating mHealth applications such as Calm and Guru to help me with self-care activities such as meditation which can be undertaken at home or office (Brow, 2022).

 

Brown, S. (2022). Apps to help you embrace self-carehttps://www.cnet.com/tech/services-and-software/10-apps-to-help-you-embrace-self-care/