NRS 493 Why is understanding the health care system at the local level important to consider when planning an EBP implementation?

NRS 493 Why is understanding the health care system at the local level important to consider when planning an EBP implementation?

NRS 493 Why is understanding the health care system at the local level important to consider when planning an EBP implementation?

Several factors are critical to the implementation of EBP. 3 critical components to implementation is the strategy or “intervention” being used, barriers and facilitators (factors that influence the implementation of evidence in clinical practice) and the desired outcomes of the implementation (Correa, Lugo-Aguirre-Acevedo, Contreras, et. Al, 2020). To decide these factors a needs assessment should be conducted for the facility, as well as the community or population being served. Proper understanding of healthcare systems at a local level is vital when planning an EBP implementation because it requires various resources from the local level, including skilled human resources essential to providing leadership and the necessary competence. The importance of an in-depth understanding of the available human capital at the local level. These include the presence of adequate medical personnel such as nurses, physicians and other professionals necessary for successful implementation of EBP at the local level.  Secondly, the organizational structure of the healthcare system at the local level plays a critical role in promoting the implementation of EBP successfully. Organizational factors include providing continuous education on EBP not only one time and providing opportunity for staff to improve their skills. Organizational support is essential in EBP implementation (Sindi, Hamouda & Bankhar, 2017).

 

References

Correa, V. C., Lugo-Agudelo, L. H., Aguirre-Acevedo, D. C., Contreras, J., Borrero, A., Patiño-Lugo, D. F., & Valencia, D. (2020). Individual, health system, and contextual barriers and facilitators for the implementation of clinical practice guidelines: a systematic metareview. Health research policy and systems, 18(1), 74. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12961-020-00588-8

 

Sindi, N. A., Hamouda, G. M., & Bankhar, M. (2017). Factors Affecting Implementation of Evidence Based Practice as Perceived by Nurses’. IOSR Journal of Nursing and Health Science, 06(04), 53–57. doi: 10.9790/1959-0604025357

The importance of an in-depth understanding of the available human capital at the local level includes adequate medical personnel such as nurses, physicians, and other professionals necessary to implement EBP at the local level successfully. Empirical evidence indicates that the willingness of an organization’s leadership to implement evidence-based practice promotes the availability of other critical resources such as funding, training opportunities, and adequate human resources (Green & Tones, 2009). In this regard, it is essential to understand the leadership of the healthcare system at the local level to determine its willingness to implement EBP. Thirdly, understanding the healthcare system’s culture at the local level is essential to consider when planning and implementing EBP. Some critical aspects of culture include the organizational norms, such as policies applied in human resources management and traditions of the local communities in which the healthcare system is based. Cultural factors play an essential role in influencing the successful implementation of EBP because it influences the cooperation of the stakeholders in the process (Green & Tones, 2009).

 

Reference

 

Bonham, C., Sommerfeld,D., Willging, C., & Aarons, G.(2014). Organizational factors  influencing implementation of evidence-based practices for integrated treatment in behavioral health agencies. Psychiatry Journal, 2014, doi:10.1155/2014/802983.

Green, J.,& Tones, K.(2009). Towards a secure evidence base for health promotion. Journal of  Public Health Medicine, 21(2):133-139.

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Long-term care encompasses a wide range of services to meet an individual’s care demands throughout a long period. In addition, when people can no longer undertake normal tasks, these facilities help them live as freely and safely as possible. Therefore, for various reasons, a thorough grasp of the local healthcare system is essential when developing an EBP deployment considering this project. EBP development necessitates a variety of local inputs. Intellectual resources and decent money are two of these assets. In addition, smart, professional resources are needed to provide supervision and the requisite expertise during the successful implementation of the strategy. As a result, having a thorough awareness of the available human capital at the local level is critical in developing an EBP, which will help address nursing shortages in the lengthy-term care facilities (Schmidt et al., 2019). These include having enough health workers, such as nurses, doctors, and other specialists, executing EBP successfully at the local level. Again, the structure of an organization of the healthcare system at the local level is crucial in encouraging successful EBP adoption.

Moreover, EBP adoption may be influenced by local characteristics that nurses should know before implementing

NRS 493 Why is understanding the health care system at the local level important to consider when planning an EBP implementation
NRS 493 Why is understanding the health care system at the local level important to consider when planning an EBP implementation

the project. Acknowledging local characteristics is crucial since they define the society’s distinctive requirements and the facility. In addition, recognizing people’s local concerns aids professionals in determining where proof is required to modify the approach. For instance, nursing shortages in long-term care facilities may be associated with several factors; among them is a reduced enrollment of nursing students in training institutions, and other challenges may have also accompanied this. Therefore, before implementing an EBP, it is important to recognize the health care system at the local level since this is the backbone of this project as it addresses several concerns (Zhao 2022 et al., 2022).

In conclusion, Evidence-based practice can be successfully implemented locally through transformative leadership, cooperation, and shared vision with the hospital and community partners. Because the change in practice will need to be executed by a supportive staff, the local hospital’s culture must be examined. To overcome nursing shortages in long-term care facilities, revolutionary leadership is critical. The work context in which the evidence-based practice suggestion will be implemented must be considered ahead of time.

References

Schmidt, M., Schmidt, S. A. J., Adelborg, K., Sundbøll, J., Laugesen, K., Ehrenstein, V., & Sørensen, H. T. (2019). The Danish health care system and epidemiological research: from health care contacts to database records. Clinical epidemiology11, 563.

Zhao, J., Bai, W., Zhang, Q., Su, Y., Wang, J., Du, X., … & Hu, J. (2022). Evidence-based practice implementation in healthcare in China: a living scoping review. The Lancet Regional Health-Western Pacific20, 100355.

You mentioned that reduced enrollment of nursing students may be the cause of the nursing shortage. What I’ve found is that it is not reduced enrollment, but rather a lack of faculty staff to teach at nursing institutions. The article by Reese and Ketner states that “hiring and retaining qualified nursing faculty remains a significant challenge; the current faculty shortage only intensifies the situation” (Reese & Ketner, 2017). Getting your masters in nurse education is a prerequisite for becoming a nurse educator. I would love to get my master’s and become a nurse educator, but I do not have $30,000 to do so since I have two children at home, and saving for their education is a priority. I chose to get an ADN because of the cost and speed of entering the workforce as a single mother. I had some difficulty at first finding a position at an acute care hospital and eventually had to travel to a suburb to start my career at a trauma level 3 hospital. I have since transferred to a trauma level 1 hospital closer to home but still in a suburb. My eventual plan after graduating with my BSN is to transfer again to the trauma level 1 acute care hospital that is 7 minutes from my house, in Dallas, TX. I am also planning to get my OCN and chemotherapy certification because I want to remain in oncology and also grow my career.

Your patient population is at a long-term care facility. The article by Petges and Sabio points out that “BSN programs do not have the capacity to accommodate all qualified applicants for admission, leaders in both ADN and BSN education have begun to work collaboratively to create a seamless academic progression through clinical partnerships and dual-enrollment agreement” (Petges & Sabio, 2020). When I was hired in 2018, I was told that I had two years to complete my BSN. Thankfully, since I have been working towards that goal but fell short of the timeframe, no one is pressuring me in terms of job security.

Again, the nursing shortage is a multi-layered issue. Those nurses who do get a master’s in nursing get paid more in leadership positions than being a nurse educator so the incentive to teach is low. However, recruiting and retaining nurse educators is key to training the next generation of nurses to help alleviate the nursing shortage. EBP is successful when safe nurse staffing is the norm and nurses have the education to implement the practice.

 

Reference

Petges, N., & Sabio, C. (2020). Understanding the Enrollment Decisions of Associate Degree Nursing Students: A Qualitative Study. Teaching and Learning in Nursing, 15(1), 25–31. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.teln.2019.08.006

Reese, C. N., & Ketner, M. B. (2017). The Nurse Educator Institute. Nurse Educator, 42(5), 224–225. https://doi.org/10.1097/nne.0000000000000380