NRSG 495 In delivering patient-centered care, nurses also assist the patient and significant others with their own critical thinking skills to achieve health literacy

NRSG 495 In delivering patient-centered care, nurses also assist the patient and significant others with their own critical thinking skills to achieve health literacy

NRSG 495 In delivering patient-centered care, nurses also assist the patient and significant others with their own critical thinking skills to achieve health literacy

The provision of patient-centered care is one of the major focuses of healthcare professionals such as nurses. Hence, they use various strategies to ensure that they deliver quality and safe care to the patients. Effective and efficient care also entails offering the necessary support to patients whenever they are diagnosed with serious chronic illnesses, terminal conditions, and life-threatening diseases (Rolland, 2019). As part of the efforts, nurses may also assist the patients and significant others with their own critical thinking skills to help them achieve health literacy. The need of health literacy is required by patients and significant others, especially when the patient is diagnosed with critical acute illness, to help them come to have a better understanding of the condition and the next steps to be followed for the appropriate management and possible recovery. While there are several critical thinking skills that the patients and significant others can use in this respect, the two skills that I believe are most often used by the patients and their significant others when diagnosed with a critical acute illness are analyzing and information seeking (“University of Michigan,” n.d).

Analyzing as a critical thinking skill entails considering a situation at hand and trying to figure out why the situation is occurring. The implication is that the patients and their significant others will try to understand what critical acute illness means, especially in the context of its impact on their health going forward, and the best way to approach the illness. The other critical thinking skill applied in this situation is information seeking. The patient and significant others know that nurses and other healthcare professionals have adequate knowledge regarding such illness. Hence, they will inquire more about the condition to find out additional information about the condition, such as possible causes, if there is anything wrong they might have done to get the illness, and the best approaches to follow or use to ensure appropriate management of the condition (Barker et al., 2018).

Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our Verified MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS: NRSG 495 In delivering patient-centered care, nurses also assist the patient and significant others with their own critical thinking skills to achieve health literacy

An example of a clinical practice that would describe the rationale of the behaviors that a patient or significant other

NRSG 495 In delivering patient-centered care, nurses also assist the patient and significant others with their own critical thinking skills to achieve health literacy
NRSG 495 In delivering patient-centered care, nurses also assist the patient and significant others with their own critical thinking skills to achieve health literacy

may exhibit when using critical thinking skills is when a patient has been diagnosed with a condition such as cancer. Cancer is feared by many and immediately makes patients panic (Sharpe et al.,2018). Therefore, the patient or the significant others, as a response, may resort to information seeking and analysis to try and have a better understanding of the type of cancer and what they can potentially do either treat, manage or prolong their lives. Therefore, there is a need for nurses to help them develop an adequate understanding of the condition and ensure that the patients take the necessary steps.

References

Barker, I., Steventon, A., Williamson, R., & Deeny, S. R. (2018). Self-management capability in patients with long-term conditions is associated with reduced healthcare utilisation across a whole health economy: Cross-sectional analysis of electronic health records. BMJ Quality & Safety27(12), 989–999. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjqs-2017-007635

Rolland, J. S. (2019). Families, health, and illness. Handbook of health social work, 331-357. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119420743.ch15

Sharpe, L., Curran, L., Butow, P., & Thewes, B. (2018). Fear of cancer recurrence and death anxiety. Psycho‐Oncology27(11), 2559–2565. https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.4783

University of Michigan. (n.d.). Critical thinking habits of the mind. http://www.umich.edu/~elements/probsolv/strategy/ctmind.htm