NSG 517 Identify an example of how you can uphold and improve the ethical practice of your profession

NSG 517 Identify an example of how you can uphold and improve the ethical practice of your profession

NSG 517 Identify an example of how you can uphold and improve the ethical practice of your profession

After reviewing this weeks content, I will uphold and improve the ethical practice of my profession by striving to maintain an ethical environment for everyone involved. According to Tracy and O’Grady (2019), “thoughtful ethical decision making arises from an environment that supports and values the critical exchange of ideas and promotes collaboration among members of the health care team, patients, and families” (p.331). I think this inclusive understanding of an ethical environment is crucial. I also feel that preventive ethics is optimal because it is preventing the problem before it arises. I will be sure to always use reflection and to seek opinions that are different from my own. Furthermore, I will be sure to take moral action when needed, in order to address ethical issues that may come up.

After reading this week’s article, I feel that my strengths are being a good listener and being a good sport and showing appreciation. I feel that I could use work on learning from my mistakes and being motivated. When it comes to myself, I can be brutal. I feel that I am much harder on myself than anyone else. I easily can accept feedback, however I do beat myself up afterward. To strengthen this skill, I will try to remember some of the concepts that we have learned in this course. For example, one that really resonated with me was that it’s ok to make mistakes. While we all know this, I feel that it is easily forgotten and that we demand perfection of ourselves. I will try next time to take a brief pause and a deep breath and remind myself of this. What I also found interesting was reading that, “differing interpretations or uptakes of feedback may be based on a number of factors that include: personality, fear, confidence, context and individual reasoning processes” (Hardevella et al., 2017). After reading this, I thought that perhaps I could benefit from working on my confidence.

 

References

 

Hardavella, G., Aamli-Gaagnat, A., Saad, N., Rousalova, I., & Sreter, K. B. (2017). How to give and receive
feedback effectively. Breathe (Sheffield, England)13(4), 327–333. https://doi.org/10.1183/20734735.009917 (Links to an external site.)

Tracy, M.F., & O’Grady, E.T. (2019). Hamric and Hanson’s advanced practice nursing: An integrative approach. Elsevier.

I appreciated your discussion about maintaining an ethical environment, and specifically, your focus on preventive ethics. According to Tracy and O’Grady (2018), preventive ethics are important in both promoting ethical environments and preventing avoidable ethical dilemmas from occurring. Exercising preventive ethics includes that “all important values should be reviewed and examined prior to the conflict so that situations in which values may conflict can be anticipated” (Tracy & O’Grady, 2018, p. 332). When doing our reading for this week, I was particularly struck by the topic of preventive ethics in light of the Covid pandemic and the frequent absence of advance directives in our society. When I took the evidence based research course, I researched health care proxies and advance directives and was stunned by the number of people in our country without advance directives or designated health care proxies. A preventive ethics approach would prioritize determining a patient’s wishes early in the establishment of care. Although this approach would not remove all possible dilemmas, it would certainly help to prevent some conflicts in the event of a medical emergency or change in status. One can see how important this is after living through the height of the pandemic, where families had to make end of life decisions for loved ones, seeing them only through a Facetime video. I imagine there are many nurses and patients’ family members still dealing with the moral distress that resulted from some of these specific situations. It is sad to think that some of this distress may have been prevented with a preventive ethics approach.

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I had a similar answer regarding my ability to take constructive feedback. I also tend to be very hard on myself and

NSG 517 Identify an example of how you can uphold and improve the ethical practice of your profession
NSG 517 Identify an example of how you can uphold and improve the ethical practice of your profession

demand perfection in my performance. I found the learning resources this week to be preparative for becoming a new nurse practitioner, and was grateful for the advice given. Not that I would ever call myself a true expert at anything, but according to Benner’s model, I am at the expert level in my current career as a nurse, as I have worked in my current position for 11 years, and am now able to apply both an intuitive and holistic approach in my care of patients (Nutt et al., n.d.). Given this, going back to the level of a novice when I am a new nurse practitioner will be a major change for me. I tend to find that expectation is everything. Having my expectations reframed and knowing that I will be a novice in this next step in my career helped me to lower my anxiety and expectations on myself. Tracy and O’Grady (2018) gave good advice for handling this role change, recommending role rehearsal, skill development, and maintaining an adequate support network. I will be sure to focus on these things as I move forward toward my goal of becoming a nurse practitioner.

References

Nutt, L., Savage, J. & Scanlon, A. (n. d.) From novice to expert, Patricia Benner [PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved from Rivier University Canvas course page.

Tracy, M. F., & O’Grady, E. T. (2018). Hamric & Hanson’s Advanced Practice Nursing – E-Book (6th Edition). Elsevier Health Sciences (US). https://bookshelf.vitalsource.com/books/9780323447706 (Links to an external site.)

Promoting collaboration among the patient’s healthcare team is crucial to ensure that the patient is receiving quality care. Being part of the patient’s healthcare team and collaborating with other members allows us to care for the patient holistically. It helps to reduce errors and decreases frustration for the patients. Communication is important for making informed and responsible decisions. It is also important that we listen to other team members. Communicating, listening, and working together as a team allows us to reflect and utilize the knowledge of others. It also allows us to be able to address any ethical issues we may face (Tracy & O’Grady, 2019).

I agree with you that reminding ourselves that it is okay to make mistakes will aid us in receiving feedback without feeling bad about it. I find that in many cases how I feel about the feedback I am receiving is often determined by how I personally feel about the situation. I do appreciate feedback but it can be difficult to accept at times. I also feel that working on confidence will help with this and for me I need to work on my confidence with providing feedback.

 

Tracy, M, & O’Grady, E. (2019). Hamric and Hanson’s advanced practice nursing: An integrative approach. St. Louis, MS: Elsevier

This week’s readings regarding ethical practice were very enlightening for me. There is no shortage of ethical issues working in the field of transplant, where we care for both newly transplanted individuals and those waiting for organs. I have definitely been able to determine ethical issues when they emerge, but it is often difficult or uncomfortable to speak up when they do. According to Tracy and O’Grady (2018), failure of providers to communicate ethical concerns for patients remains a significant problem in healthcare. Considering that less than 20% of clinicians speak up when a patient’s immediate safety is in question, it is arguable that even fewer address ethical issues when presented (Tracy & O’Grady, 2018). I believe that this lack of advocacy stems from both “blunted… moral sensitivity” (Tracy & O’Grady, 2018, p. 330) and an abundance of healthcare settings that do not foster an ethical environment. I believe I can uphold and improve ethical practice by becoming more informed of ways to promote ethical discussions and to evaluate ethical situations. By delving into knowledge development, the first step of the core competency for ethical decision making, I will naturally be more comfortable in bringing my concerns forward during rounds with physicians and in the future with my own patients. One specific way that I could become more informed is to research specific theories, professional codes, standards and legal precedents surrounding specific ethical situations I am confronted with. This will help me to take a logical approach to the situation, rather than having a knee jerk reaction based on my own personal biases (Tracy & O’Grady, 2018).