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NUR 514 Discuss how emerging technologies (consumer, mobile and telehealth technologies) impact patient care and the storage of health information - Writing Professors
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NUR 514 Discuss how emerging technologies (consumer, mobile and telehealth technologies) impact patient care and the storage of health information

NUR 514 Discuss how emerging technologies (consumer, mobile and telehealth technologies) impact patient care and the storage of health information

NUR 514 Discuss how emerging technologies (consumer, mobile and telehealth technologies) impact patient care and the storage of health information

The emerging technologies used in the healthcare field impact patient care. EMR (electronic medical records) allow quick access to patient information and assist in providing coordinated care (DeNisco, 2021). This information can be accessed by a provided via computer, tablet, or smartphone, allowing for real-time quality reporting and quick action in critical situations. Technology use of communication between systems with interoperability decreases delay reporting issues and provides a safer, more reliable way of medication management (DeNisco, 2021). These same systems allow patients to retrieve pertinent health information. The age of advanced technology and shared knowledge that benefits the patient must be handled with meticulous professional care. Nurses must document information accurately and in real time. Any missed notification of critical information to a physician can be detrimental to the patient, and the nurse as these electronic records are legal documents. Another concern is HIPAA (The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) which protects health information (PHI) and requires privacy and confidentiality (DeNisco, 2021). Information gathered in the health care setting must be written or signed consent documentation to transfer data to another physician or facility. This information is also readily available to all working in a clinical environment. Often clinical staff does not realize that when they are working on or walking away from their mobile computers, they leave patient information exposed. This is a direct HIPAA violation. One action that is good practice can protect the patient, and the nurse is to use a privacy screen before walking away from the computer or completely logging out. Even though the digital age is advancing patient access to HPI, it does propose many other avenues for error.

References

DeNisco, S. (2021). Advanced Practice Nursing.

 

I think you did a great job answering this discussion question and provided great examples. I like that you mentioned the example of EMRs with patient information being exposed when a nurse leaves their computer or is even at their computer. I have unfortunately been guilty of leaving a chart open on my computer when running to check on a patient. As you mentioned, privacy screens are a great tool to use, as they keep patients and visitors from seeing information when they come to the nurse’s station to ask a question. With this, they may not be helpful when the computer is stationed in an area where someone can walk up behind, such as an alcove. One way my place of work and others have worked to prevent charts from being left open on computers is by installing employee badge sign-in software. This makes it very fast to lock the computer and reopen it to the same place in the chart you were in when you logged out. What are some tactics that your place of work has used to keep patient information private?

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The Electronic Health Record (EHR) is the primary means of interprofessional communication. The ethical and legal issues are patient safety and quality, and documentation. The United States has reached 95 percent penetration with electronic health records as a tool to document healthcare delivery in acute care hospitals and aid clinical decision-making since adopting the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act in 2009. There is growing evidence that electronic health records (EHRs) have unexpected consequences that compromise patient safety. Safe and effective clinical care is only possible if doctors are equipped with the tools, they need to make ethical decisions based on usability challenges (McBride et al., 2018).

The American Nurses Association (ANA) (2015) Scope and Standards of Nursing Practice set the standard of practice for registered nurses in the United States, including the requirement that “Nurses shall document important data accurately and, in a way accessible to the interprofessional team” (ANA, 2015, p. 54). All nursing documentation must adhere to “factuality, correctness, completeness, timeliness, organization, and compliance” (ANA, 2015, p. 270). Documentation must be transparent and correct for nurses’ contributions to patient outcomes and healthcare organizations’ continued success (McBride et al., 2018).

The necessity of using encryption software on all computers and mobile devices. Email encryption is one form of in-

NUR 514 Discuss how emerging technologies (consumer, mobile and telehealth technologies) impact patient care and the storage of health information
NUR 514 Discuss how emerging technologies (consumer, mobile and telehealth technologies) impact patient care and the storage of health information

transit encryption. An intrusion detection system’s job is to monitor any suspicious behavior on a network. Solutions for auditing that keep an eye out for unauthorized access to protected health information. Protect confidentiality by locking screens, informing the team of locking screens, locking screens and informing the team of any changes through frequent audits. This will help ensure conformity with applicable norms and limits of practice.

References

McBride, S., Tietze, M., Robichaux, C., Stokes, L., & Weber, E. (2018). Identifying and addressing ethical issues with use of electronic health records. OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 23(1). https://doi.org/10.3912/ojin.vol23no01man05

Thank you for sharing your post. I have a story regarding the email encryption option for sharing protected health information (PHI). I work for the VA, and they have a very secure email system and constant computer system updates to prevent malicious emails from attempting to infiltrate and take PHI. In one instance I had to request records from Kaiser Permanente because one of our patients was seen and cared for by Kaiser and we needed documents to coordinate continuing care. I faxed the request for information (ROI) as I usually do to their medical records office. Then I received a fax back explaining that records requested from other doctor’s offices must send a request via encrypted email and they provided the right email to use. I did as I was indicated and after some days went by, I received an email from them that had the records attached. Once I proceeded to access the email my computer alerted me that the file had been deleted by the VA security systems as a precaution because it was flagged as suspicious. I had to contact IT and explain the situation to them, and the files had to be scanned by a security person and make sure it was safe to access. Then the file was faxed to me for faster access. This whole process saves the VA from unsecured emails that are sent to access the system to steal PHI. At the same time, the care of the patient was delayed because the complete process took 2 weeks to get resolved. I think there has to be a faster way to verify that emails are clear and do not pose a threat to the security of the VA system to provide faster care for patients.

Thank you for sharing.

As for your case, I agree that there needs to be a better and faster method of making patient information safe and secure. This is to ensure that there is no delay in the process of patient care.

The electronic medical record (EMR) is a digital version of all the information you’d typically find in a provider’s paper chart: medical history, diagnoses, medications, immunization dates, allergies, lab results and doctor’s notes. The EMRs are online medical records of the standard medical and clinical data from one provider’s office, mostly used by providers for diagnosis and treatment. Comprehensive and accurate documentation of a patient’s medical history, tests, diagnosis and treatment in EMRs ensures appropriate care throughout the provider’s clinic and the healthcare systems within a hospital setting. EMRs are not just a replacement for paper records, they effectively allow communication and coordination among members of a healthcare team for optimal patient care. The natural evolution of the EMR began in the 1960s when we began to see “problem-oriented” medical records instead of just the diagnosis and treatment a doctor provided. This was the first time that third party facilities were able to independently verify the diagnosis. With the dawn of the computer era, many of the earliest computer applications were being used at hospitals but at few other places. Computers were being used in smaller facilities and clinics at the same time computers were gaining traction with the general public.

https://www.healthit.gov/buzz-blog/electronic-health-and-medical-records/emr-vs-ehr-difference