NURS 8302 Strategies for Building Effective Teams

NURS 8302 Strategies for Building Effective Teams

NURS 8302 Strategies for Building Effective Teams

Post a brief explanation of a strategy you might recommend for building effective teams to support a quality improvement initiative in your healthcare organization or nursing practice. Be specific.

The strategy I recommend for building an effective team is to use the knowledge, skills, experiences, and perspectives from a wide range of people. This is essential for a QI project to succeed (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services, n. d.).  Effective teams are comprised of members that can represent all three aspects of expertise within the organization. These three aspects include system leadership, technical expertise, and day-to-day leadership (Institute for Healthcare Improvement, n.d.). Each member of the team should have clearly defined roles and expectations as well as fulfill the following team attributes: respected by most of the staff, good communicators and team players, proven problem solvers, flexible and creative (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services, n. d.).   QI teams perform best when responsibilities are clearly delineated for each role as team members are not able to perform at their potential if they do not clearly understand what is expected of them (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2017).

Briefly describe the stakeholders you would recommend to make up this quality improvement team, and explain why. Be sure to define the roles of the members making up the quality improvement team.

            The system leader has the authority within that organization to institute the needed change and overcome the challenges that may inhibit the project. They have the time and resources that are needed to complete the QI project (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services, n. d.).  The technical expert knows the subject intimately and understands the processes of care project (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services, n. d.). The day-to-day leader is the driver of the project who knows the details of the system and the effects that the change will have across the organization (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services, n. d.). The day-to-day leader works closely and well with the champion physician on the QI project details.

Then, explain any potential challenges or considerations you should keep in mind that may affect who might “earn a seat at the table” to comprise this team. Be specific and provide examples.

            A potential challenge that must be considered on the QI team is team dynamics. This can change throughout

NURS 8302 Strategies for Building Effective Teams
NURS 8302 Strategies for Building Effective Teams

the project and can present challenges as each team member may have a different communication and social style. The team should focus on constructive communication in which everyone has the same goal in mind (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services, n. d.). Team members should be flexible and embrace diverse ideas for the team to complete the QI successfully (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services, n. d.).

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References

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2017). Forming a comprehensive unitbased safety program team: Facilitator guide. https://www.ahrq.gov/hai/tools/mvp/modules/cusp/forming-cusp-team-facguide.htm

Institute for Healthcare Improvement. (n.d.-d). Science of improvement: Forming the team. http://www.ihi.org/resources/Pages/HowtoImprove/ScienceofImprovementFormin gtheTeam.aspx

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services © 2021 Walden University, LLC Page 6 of 6 Administration. (n. d.). Improvement teams. https://www.hrsa.gov/sites/default/files/quality/toolbox/508pdfs/improvementteam s.pdf

Using management theories and frameworks are an important component of quality improvement and developing an effective team. One theory that is can be used is the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s (IHI) High-Impact Leadership Framework (HILF) (Nash et al., 2019). The IHI’s HILF reinforces that idea that leadership engagement improves focus and improvements in healthcare quality and patient safety (Swensen et al., 2013). Leaders in all areas of healthcare administration can utilize the tenants of the HILF to achieve Triple Aim (TA) results that provide high quality and high-fidelity care to patients. The TA framework complements the HILF framework by establishing objectives for improving healthcare service delivery. The TA focuses on improving the health of populations, enhance healthcare for those populations and reduce per-person cost of care (Revere et al., 2020). The HILF framework notes six domains that leaders must focus efforts on to benefit formation of an effective team. These domains include the ideas that leaders are driven by people and community, they work to create vision and build will, they focus on developing capability and delivering results, they shape culture, and they engage individuals across boundaries (Swensen et al., 2013).

Once a strategy has been formatted, key stakeholders that form the team should be identified. According to the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), effective teams are composed of representatives from within the organization; specifically, system/clinical leadership, technical specialization, and day-to-day leadership (n.d.). The team can consist of more individuals, but the three base specialties must be present in their most minimal form. The system leader has the authority within the organization to institute change and address issues; the technical expert can speak to the subject and processes as well as provide technical support; the day-to-day leader implements testing and data collection (Institute for Healthcare Improvement, n.d.). For example, the department I currently work is Interventional Radiology (IR); it is an interdisciplinary team consisting of radiologists, nurses, and radiological technologists (RT). The key stakeholder team in the IR for change would include the IR physician group (system leader), IR manager (technical specialist), and IR nurses and RTs. This is the base team required for quality improvement change. However, additional stakeholders/team members could include staff that work with IR and are relevant to the needed change including procedural inventory, environmental services, respiratory therapy, and patient transport among others. Extemporaneous team members should not be included unless necessary to keep change processes succinct and moving toward completion in a streamlined manner.

 

Swensen S, Pugh M, McMullan C, Kabcenell A. (2013). High-Impact Leadership: Improve Care, Improve the Health of Populations, and Reduce Costs. IHI White Paper. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Healthcare Improvement.

 

Nash, D. B., Joshi, M. S., & Ransom, E. R., & Ransom, S. B., (Eds.). (2019). The healthcare quality book: Vision, strategy, and tools (4th ed.). Chicago, IL: Health Administration Press.

 

Revere, L., Kavarthapu, N., Hall, J., & Begley, C. (2020). Achieving Triple Aim Outcomes: An Evaluation of the Texas Medicaid Waiver. Inquiry (00469580)57, 1–10. DOI: 10.1177/046958020923547

Institute for Healthcare Improvement. (n.d.). Science of Improvement: Forming the team: Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Retrieved October 11, 2021, from http://www.ihi.org/resources/Pages/HowtoImprove/ScienceofImprovementFormingtheTeam.aspx.