NURS FPX 4060 Assessing the Problem: Technology, Care Coordination, and Community Resources Considerations

Sample Answer for NURS FPX 4060 Assessing the Problem Technology, Care Coordination, and Community Resources Considerations Included After Question

Instructions:

Every 10 years, the U.S. department of health and human services and the office of disease prevention and health promotion release information on health indicators, public health issues, and current trends. at the end of 2020, healthy people 2030 was released to provide information for the next 10 years. healthy people 2030 provides the most updated content when it comes to prioritizing public health issues; however, there are historical contents that offer a better understanding of some topics. disaster preparedness is addressed in healthy people 2030, but a more robust understanding of map-it, triage, and recovery efforts is found in healthy people 2020. for this reason, you will find references to both healthy people 2020 and healthy people 2030 in this course.

Complete the following:

NURS FPX 4060 Assessing the Problem: Technology, Care Coordination, and Community Resources Considerations
NURS FPX 4060 Assessing the Problem: Technology, Care Coordination, and Community Resources Considerations

 

  • Develop a disaster recovery plan for the vila health community that will lessen health disparities and improve access to services after a disaster. refer back to the vila health: disaster recovery scenario to understand the vila health community.
    assess community needs.
  • consider resources, personnel, budget, and community makeup
  • identify the people accountable for implementation of the plan and describe their roles.
  • focus on specific healthy people 2020 goals and 2030 objectives.
  • include a timeline for the recovery effort.
  • apply the map-it (mobilize, assess, plan, implement, track) framework to guide the development of your plan:mobilize collaborative partners.
  • assess community needs.
  • use the demographic data and specifics related to the disaster to identify the needs of the community and develop a recovery plan. consider physical, emotional, cultural, and financial needs of the entire community. include in your plan the equitable allocation of services for the diverse community.
  • apply the triage classification to provide a rationale for those who may have been injured during the train derailment. provide support for your position. include in your plan contact tracing of the homeless, disabled, displaced community members, migrant workers, and those who have hearing impairment or english as a second language in the event of severe tornadoes.
  • plan to lessen health disparities and improve access to services.
  • implement a plan to reach healthy people 2020 goals and 2030 objectives.
  • track and trace-map community progress.
  • use the cdc’s contract tracing resources for health departments as a template to create your contact tracing.
  • describe the plan for contact tracing during the disaster and recovery phase.
  • develop a slide presentation of your disaster recovery plan with an audio recording of you presenting your assessment of the vila health: disaster recovery scenario for city officials and the disaster relief team. be sure to also include speaker notes.

 

A Sample Answer For the Assignment: NURS FPX 4060 Assessing the Problem Technology, Care Coordination, and Community Resources Considerations

Title: NURS FPX 4060 Assessing the Problem Technology, Care Coordination, and Community Resources Considerations

Analyze the impact of healthcare technology on the patient, family, or population problem

As nurses, we use healthcare technology in our daily routines for almost every aspect of patient care. From texting as communication, electronic charts, scanning medications, placing orders, electronic scripts, and now telehealth. The advancement of technology has improved patient care, the safety of patients, given more access to resources, and has improved the coordination of care for most patients, organizations, and providers.  This paper will analyze the impact of healthcare technology and the state board of nursing on a patient with diabetes and how care coordination and community resources can be used to address a patient with diabetes.

Analyze the impact of healthcare technology on the patient, family, or population problem

Healthcare technology can impact a patient in several ways. For example, patient electronic portals have been developed to give patients immediate access to healthcare information. Patients can use these portals to their advantage to view labs, test results, and even radiology/scan results. They can make or view oncoming appointments, communicate with the nurse or provider, request medication refills, and also view past visit summaries. These portals can be accessed via computer, phone, or tablet and can be found through an app or direct websites, whichever is more convenient for the patient. Portals can save patients time by giving them access to their health information (Miller Jr et al., 2016). This type of technology is also advantageous to providers and healthcare workers as well. The patient’s ability to look up their own results saves the healthcare workers time by not having to call each individual patient with their results, or answer phone calls as to whether something has resulted. Providers are able to refill medications requested through the portal saving them time by not having to answer the phone and also giving the provider a clear and concise order to refill given the patients typically have a hard time pronouncing or spelling these medications. Thus, reducing med errors and possible duplications, increasing time proficiency, and increasing safety for the patient. The research of Alotaibi & Federico, 2017 showed patient portals improved medication adherence, disease awareness, self-management of disease, and patient satisfaction.

Some disadvantages of patient portals to the healthcare staff can also be seen. Patients can still be impatient and have a hard time waiting for the results to show in the portal, this leads to an increase in messages through the portal asking when things will be resulted. Information in the portals could also lead to confusing the patients causing them concern and more calls to the clinic (Miller Jr et al., 2016). The portal also gives a false sense of time to patients making them think they should receive an immediate answer to these messages which then turns into phone calls to get answers to their messages.

Evidence is consistent with the technology use seen during my nursing practice. Personally, as a bedside nurse, I have found patients with access to the patient portal to be frustrating. Admitted patients, typically the younger to middle-aged will often ask me questions regarding their results or scans they looked up in the portal. They are usually confused and want an interpretation of the results or diagnosis they have seen that only a provider can disclose for the first time. The patients then get angry when I tell them a provider must come to see them to discuss details of the results and they become impatient. Due to the provider’s lack of communication, the patient is now just as frustrated as I am, and with good reason. I have also had patients who will often ask about the portals and how to access or ask for help navigating through the portal to find a certain piece of information. Then there are family members of patients who call inquiring about results they saw in the portal and demand answers or demand we treat what they saw with something they found googling on the internet, which has several avenues of misinformation, making my job as a nurse and the provider’s job even more difficult when attempting to provide the best care possible.

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Potential barriers associated with patient portals also exist. Such as alienating the older population. To the elderly technology can be challenging or even feared due to their lack of knowledge when it comes to smartphones, computers, or technology not of their generation. Older adults are the least likely to log on to the patient portal and the least likely to use the internet or email (Miller Jr et al., 2016). For some elderly, vision may be a problem, lack of dexterity in their hands or ability to comprehend may deter them from using or accessing the portal. Another barrier is the widening health disparities. The research of Miller Jr et al., 2016 showed patients of low socioeconomic status, less education, lower incomes, and lower health literacy are also less likely to access the portals and report they are difficult to use or not user-friendly. Those with lower incomes, less education, and of lower socioeconomic status may not have direct access to a computer, smartphone, tablet, or internet service to be able to utilize the portal. It is likely they also do not have the income available to purchase a device to access the patient portal. The research of Miller Jr et al., 2016 found that although clinic personnel found advantages to portals, they had more concerns about the portals causing additional work, confusing patients, and had the concern it would perhaps alienate non-users.

Explain how care coordination and the utilization of community resources can be used to address the patient, family, or population problem

Care coordination and community resources such as patient portals can be used to address diabetes by integrating the goals, preferences, and values of the patient by forming an active relationship between the patient and provider (Powell et al., 2018). Achieving coordinated care of a patient heavily relies upon communication between all participants and has several benefits such as the delivery of safe, appropriate, and effective care. Providers can use the patient portals to send messages regarding follow-up care quickly and easily. Providers can also use the portal to notify the patient of electronic scripts that have been sent to the pharmacy for them to pick up when convenient, eliminating the need for the patient to pick up a paper script form the office, deliver to a pharmacy, wait for it to be filled, then take it home for use. The coordination of care between the provider, pharmacy, and patient also makes delivery of medications straight to the patients’ door with delivery services provided by the pharmacy. Care coordination within the patient portals also allows the patient to ask questions to anyone involved in the patient’s care plan. For example, the patient with diabetes should have an endocrinologist and possibly a nutritionist involved in their care. The patient would then be able to access these specialty providers and ask them questions directly about their insulin management, symptoms they have been having, or dietary questions without having to use an answering service. Care coordination of those managing chronic diseases frequently leads to improved clinical results and improved cost outcomes (Williams et al., 2019).

Care coordination and community resources such as patient portals are used in my current nursing practice. As a nurse of the intensive care unit (ICU), it is required to research the patients’ background and previous visits when attempting to provide coordinated care between all disciplines during morning report. Most patients in the ICU are intubated and do not have the ability to give insight to their past histories, previous providers, or current providers. Patient portals give access into previous visits with vital information needed to provide safe, appropriate, and effective care. For example, a patient with is diabetes is likely to have several chronic diseases, be on several medications with possible adverse reactions to others and could potentially be under the care of multiple providers.

Barriers to care coordination and community resources come into effect when communication is lacking or there is a lack in participation. Fragmentation of communication among healthcare providers or among providers and the patient make coordinating care extremely challenging (Williams et al., 2019). Socioeconomic needs of patients are also barriers to care coordination that inhibit participation. Nutrition, finances, psychosocial, housing, language and transportation should all be considered when connecting patients to available community resources and are essential to care coordination (Williams et al., 2019).

Analyze state board nursing practice standards and/or organizational or governmental policies associated with health care technology, care coordination, and community resources

The state board nursing practice standards associated with care technology, care coordination, and community resources affect the care given to patients with diabetes. The state board nursing practice standards set the regulations that guide technology use in nursing. For example, it is imperative for nurses to select evidence-based technologies to deliver care to patients suffering from diabetes. The technologies should be safe, efficient, and effective in the delivery of high-quality care to patients suffering from diabetes. In addition, they should ensure the protection of confidentiality and privacy of the patient’s data. State board nursing practice standards also set the consequences associated with the ineffective use of technology by nurses in healthcare delivery. They enforce rules and regulations that hold nurses responsible for the ineffective technology use in the promotion of patient’s health (Chen et al., 2020). Therefore, the state board of nursing standards and regulations will influence my actions as seen by ensuring that I adopt evidence-based strategies in selecting the needed technologies for diabetes management, care coordination and utilization of the existing community resources to enhance care outcomes.

Government policies associated with healthcare technology, care coordination, and community resources also influence the care given to patients with diabetes. Government policies such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (1996) affect technology use in healthcare. The policy ensures the effective and efficient use of technologies in nursing practice. Organizations must ensure that the adopted technologies safeguard the integrity of the protected patient information. The policy also ensures the adopted organizational policies ensure continued improvements in the implementation of strategies to enhance safety and efficiency in technology use in nursing. Government policies also affect the utilization of community resources for the promotion of population’s health (Leigh et al., 2020). For example, the government requires the active involvement of the community members in the mobilization and use of resources to ensure the empowerment of the community members in embracing sustainable interventions for diabetes management.

Government policies will guide my actions in applying technology, care coordination, and community resources to address care quality, patient safety, and reduce costs to the system and individual. I will adopt policies such as HIPAA and the 21st Century Act in adopting care technologies that are safe, evidence-based, and efficient to reduce costs to the patients and healthcare systems. I will explore effective models for ensuring care coordination for diabetes patients to enhance the safety, quality, and reduce costs for the optimum patient outcomes. I will also adopt ethical practices such as justice, non-maleficence, and beneficence to ensure the effective use of technology, care coordination, and community resources in improving the patient’s care outcomes (Moore & Frye, 2019). Local, state, and federal policies affect my nursing scope of practice within the context of technology, care coordination, and community resources use in diabetes management. The effect can be seen from delimitating the roles that nurses play in incorporating technology use in the care process, coordinating diabetes care, and community resources utilization in the care (Mbonihankuye et al., 2019). For example, the policies often describe the varied roles that nurses play in technology use in healthcare such as assessment, planning, implementation, monitoring, and evaluating care outcomes.

Conclusion

            In summary, technologies can be adopted in the provision of care to the selected patient in this project. Nurses should be aware of the advantages and disadvantages associated with the different technologies utilized in improving care outcomes for patients with diabetes. State board of nursing practice standards and government policies affect technology use, care coordination, and community resources utilization in addressing the care needs of patients with diabetes. They also influence the nursing scope of practice in technology use, care coordination, and community resources utilization in addressing patients’ needs. Therefore, I will strive to embrace strategies that align with the provisions of the different regulations that guide technology use in nursing, care coordination, and community resources in meeting the needs of the selected patient.

Part 2

            I met with Jason, my husband who has been caring for his father, who is diabetic.                             The meeting focused largely on technology use, care coordination, and community resources in the care of patients with diabetes. Jason noted that technologies play an essential role in the provision of high-quality care to patients to patients with diabetes. They have been using technologies such as mhealth to enhance diabetes management. They also rely on telehealth to interact with healthcare providers and ensure timely delivery of care interventions such as patient assessment, planning, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of care. They also utilize websites such as the CDC to learn more about diabetes management. The technologies have helped the family to adopt effective skills for diabetes self-management.

 

The meeting also focused on care coordination and community resources. I discovered from the interaction that Jason’s father receives home care services for diabetes management. The services include wound dressing, foot care, and weekly blood glucose assessment by the care team. He also receives transportation to the hospital on monthly basis for glycemic assessment and determination of additional care needed. However, Jason noted that the community lacks social support services for patients with diabetes. The lack of social support affects the patient outcomes since patients may feel isolated or lack inadequate knowledge and skills for diabetes management. Jason also noted the minimal role of the religious institutions in the community in supporting them in providing care to his father.

 

References

Alotaibi, Y. K., & Federico, F. (2017). The impact of health information technology on patient safety. Saudi Medical Journal, 38(12), 1173–1180. https://doi.org/10.15537/smj.2017.12.20631

Chen, F.-Q., Leng, Y.-F., Ge, J.-F., Wang, D.-W., Li, C., Chen, B., & Sun, Z.-L. (2020). Effectiveness of Virtual Reality in Nursing Education: Meta-Analysis. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 22(9), e18290. https://doi.org/10.2196/18290

Leigh, J., Vasilica, C., Dron, R., Gawthorpe, D., Burns, E., Kennedy, S., Kennedy, R., Warburton, T., & Croughan, C. (2020). Redefining undergraduate nurse teaching during the coronavirus pandemic: Use of digital technologies. British Journal of Nursing, 29(10), 566–569. https://doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2020.29.10.566

Mbonihankuye, S., Nkunzimana, A., & Ndagijimana, A. (2019). Healthcare Data Security Technology: HIPAA Compliance. Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing, 2019, e1927495. https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/1927495

 

Miller Jr, D. P., Latulipe, C., Melius, K. A., Quandt, S. A., & Arcury, T. A. (2016). Primary care providers’ views of patient portals: Interview study of perceived benefits and consequences. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 18(1), e8. https://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.4953

Moore, W., & Frye, S. (2019). Review of HIPAA, Part 1: History, Protected Health Information, and Privacy and Security Rules. Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology, 47(4), 269–272. https://doi.org/10.2967/jnmt.119.227819

Powell, K. R., PhD, RN, & Myers, C. R. (2018). Electronic patient portals: Patient and provider

perceptions: OJNI. On – Line Journal of Nursing Informatics, 22(1) http://library.capella.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2Fscholarly-journals%2Felectronic-patient-portals-provider-perceptions%2Fdocview%2F2033726655%2Fse-2%3Faccountid%3D27965

Williams, M. D., Asiedu, G. B., Finnie, D., Neely, C., Egginton, J., Finney Rutten, L. J., & Jacobson, R. M. (2019). Sustainable care coordination: A qualitative study of primary care provider, administrator, and insurer perspectives. BMC Health Services Research, 19(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-3916-5