PHI 413 How do you believe they would be ordered in the context of the Christian biblical narrative?

PHI 413 How do you believe they would be ordered in the context of the Christian biblical narrative?

PHI 413 How do you believe they would be ordered in the context of the Christian biblical narrative?

The four principles, especially in the context of bioethics in the United States, has often been critiqued for raising the principle of autonomy to the highest place, such that it trumps all other principles or values. How would you rank the importance of each of the four principles? How do you believe they would be ordered in the context of the Christian biblical narrative? Refer to the topic Resources in your response.

I would rank the four principles in this order: Nonmaleficence, respect for autonomy, beneficence, then justice. The reason why I would rank the principles in this order is because I feel like doing no harm of others should be first. Following respecting a persons wishes/wants, then preventing harm to others. Lastly, justice as the fourth in line as last principle. Although principles are prima facie binding, this means that the principles or duties must be fulfilled unless they conflict on a particular occasion with an equal or stronger principle, obligation, or duty (Hoehner, 2020).

I believe that this order is in the context of the Christian biblical narrative as followed: beneficence, respect for autonomy, nonmaleficence, then justice. I think it would be ordered this way since in the Bible, us as humans are to protect/prevent others from harm others so that is why beneficence would be first. Autonomy should be next since humans are creation of God and we were given morals and the ability to respect others. Then nonmaleficence as humans are to not cause harm to others. Justice as last again due to it meaning providing fairness and being impartial to others.

 

References:

Hoehner, P. J. (2020). Biomedical Ethics in the Christian Narrative. Practicing dignity: An introduction to Christian values and decision making in Health Care. Retrieved  from https://lc.gcumedia.com/phi413v/practicing-dignity-an-introduction-to-christian-values-and-decision-making-in-health-care/v1.1/#/chapter/3

I appreciate your viewpoint. I think that above them in the ranking is the respect for anatomy this is because respect for other people is vital and should be observed regardless of the situation. Except the individual is not mentally capable of making decisions.

The second is Beneficence where harm is prevented and all that is done is for the benefit of other people the third is

PHI 413 How do you believe they would be ordered in the context of the Christian biblical narrative
PHI 413 How do you believe they would be ordered in the context of the Christian biblical narrative

non-maleficence where people are obligated not to harm other people and finally justice. Here fair distribution is necessary for all people whether in terms of benefits, risks, or costs. However, I think that the ranking of these principles depends on the situation at hand. For example, I could say, Beneficence in this scenario is first because I would be performing the principle of positive beneficence by acting to help the person that collapsed, before even asking them for their permission if it’s ok to help them (Lawrence, 2007).

 

Reference

Lawrence, D. J. (2007). The Four Principles of Biomedical Ethics: A Foundation for Current Bioethical Debate. Journal of Chiropractic Humanities, 14(34-30). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1556-3499(13)60161-8

Every day, as we provide healthcare for people with different values living in a pluralistic and multicultural society, we are faced with ethical decisions, both little and significant.

Autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice are the four guiding principles. I must first clarify each of the four guiding principles:

Autonomy is the acceptance of another person’s right to choose their own path of action and the encouragement of independent judgment.

Beneficence-being compassionate, and having a strong desire to do good are all pillars of our patient advocacy.

 

Nonmaleficence-Core values of the medical oath and nursing ethics. Avoiding harm or hurt.

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Justice -is the equitable allocation of resources after consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of various options. Justice implies that all persons, regardless of what they have contributed or who they are, have an equal entitlement to the goods provided.

 

I believe that nonmaleficence is essential because no one should harm another person. Then I would advise beneficence because it is imperative to avoid hurting others. Because society should divide risks and benefits equally, justice would come in third. Autonomy would be the last item to lose, because if the other three were gone, nobody would respect anyone’s autonomy. They would be placed in order of importance in the Christian narrative as beneficence, nonmaleficence, autonomy, and justice. All actions are good because they aid others. Nonmaleficence places a high importance on doing no damage .

 

Depending on their convictions, each person has the freedom to make their own decisions. Justice must be administered honestly, whether it be distributive, restorative, or punitive. Each person has a different viewpoint on how people should be classified but everyone needs to live in a society that is secure and safe.

References

Hoehner, P. J. (2020). Biomedical Ethics in the Christian Narrative. Practicing dignity: An introduction to Christian values and decision making in Health Care. Retrieved  from https://lc.gcumedia.com/phi413v/practicing-dignity-an-introduction-to-christian-values-and-decision-making-in-health-care/v1.1/#/chapter/3

 

Tevan, C.M., & Gottlieb, L.J. (2018). The four-quadrant approach to ethical issues in burn care. American medical association journal of ethics. https://journalofethics.ama-assn.org/article/four-quadrant-approach-ethical-issues-burn-care/2018-06

I am in total agreement of your ranking on the bio-ethical principles. Gillon (2015) argues that the four prima facie principles-beneficence, non-maleficence, respect for autonomy and justice-afford a good and widely acceptable basis for ‘doing good medical ethics’. I believe that the principle of respect for autonomy is overly rated and most patients can abuse this principle to manipulate life saving decisions of health care workers with threats of litigation where I feel to some extent are intentional to manipulate the law. I observe that health care decision now suffer extensive negative scrutiny and implementation of life saving skills may be hindered by patients who constantly object best treatment and procedures as they exercise their rights. Some patients may take too long to consent to procedures and treatments that will eventually affect the quality of care through delayed treatment. What do you think could be the best way to mitigate this challenge?

Reference:

Gillon,R. Defending the four principles approach as a good basis for a good medical practice and therefore good medical ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics. (2015). 41(1). jme.bmj/content/41/1/111.info

The four main principles are as follows: beneficence, nonmaleficence, respect for autonomy, and justice. I feel as those each of these topics or principles is linked to the other either in that by doing one you are in turn practicing the other, or in that by neglecting one you will have to practice the other. For example, by ignoring the practice of nonmaleficence and inputting malice onto people or the world, you are creating the need for justice. So, in my opinion, nonmaleficence is ranked higher than justice. Also, while beneficence is preventing harm and providing good to others, nonmaleficence is avoiding harm towards others “above all”, so I feel that nonmaleficence once again trumps. Lastly, respect for autonomy sounds a bit like a “live and let live” principal. This entails not judging others for their perspectives, views, and opinions. It is understanding that other people have the right to live how they choose (Hoehner, 2020). If they truly follow the practice of nonmaleficence, then I believe there could be peaceful coexistence. All said, my ranking would be nonmaleficence, respect for autonomy, beneficence, and then justice. Justice falls last in the rank because if the other principals are followed, there is no need for it, and it also just sounds a bit petty to me in a colloquial sense.

In the Christian narrative, I feel that they would be ranked with beneficence, nonmaleficence, respect for autonomy, and then justice…and not because that is the order they are presented in the book! Beneficence sounds to be more selfless. The bible encourages helping others, almost in a way of giving up ones’ whole self in service of God. Almost as importantly, nonmaleficence discourages harm. At this point, people are doing good and also avoiding the placement of harm onto others. Then, respect for autonomy would encourage compassion and understanding through thought, not just action, as the first two aspects seem to encourage or discourage an action (Hoehner, 2020). Lastly, Justice would be last, because again, in practicing the first three principals, the last would be redundant.

 

Hoehner, P. (2020). Biomedical Ethics in the Christian Narrative. Practicing dignity: An introduction to Christian values and decision making in Health Care. Retrieved September 12, 2022, from https://lc.gcumedia.com/phi413v/practicing-dignity-an-introduction-to-christian-values-and-decision-making-in-health-care/v1.1/#/chapter/3