PHI 413 When it comes to facilitating spiritual care for patients with worldviews different from your own, what are your strengths and weaknesses?

PHI 413 When it comes to facilitating spiritual care for patients with worldviews different from your own, what are your strengths and weaknesses?

PHI 413 When it comes to facilitating spiritual care for patients with worldviews different from your own, what are your strengths and weaknesses?

When it comes to providing spiritual care to patients, I feel one of my strengths is to be open minded and remain neutral to the situation. I understand that others have worldviews different than my own and it is not my place to push my personal beliefs. My job is to provide as much compassion and comfort as I possibly can to the patient, which is achieved by allowing them to speak of their faith, pray, or whatever they need to do to promote their own spiritual healing. However, I feel my weakness is really lack of knowledge for religion. I did not grow up in a religious household. As an adult I also never really practiced any type of religion. My worldview is more compatible with scientism, as is most of my family. Therefore, if I was a patient in a position where I was unable to make decisions for myself, I trust my brother is the best person to make the final say in terms of ethical decision-making and interventions. We hold the same beliefs so I feel he would know what I would want.

A person’s worldview plays a significant role in their daily life, thus it is crucial that we respect it as well as their feelings, desires, and emotions (Evans, 2020). We can affect a patient’s emotional and physical health if we are mindful of their spiritual requirements. This is so because a person’s spiritual health affects their motivation for physical recovery and their willingness to engage in care and treatment techniques. It is best if a patient believes that their entire being is being taken care of. As long as we can stay impartial and refrain from imposing our own perspective on our patients, it is critical to be open-minded in circumstances when there are different worldviews.

Reference:

Evans, K.A. (2020). Intervention, ethical decision-making and spiritual care. Practicing Dignity: An Introduction to Christian Values and Decision Making in Health Care. https://lc.gcumedia.com/phi413v/practicing-dignity-an-introduction-to-christian-values-and-decision-making-in-health-care/v1.1/#/chapter/5

I know of some Policies in the workplace’s state to not bring religious practices or beliefs into patient care unless the patient

inquires or expresses spiritual care needs. I feel that it is important that we assess our patient’s spiritual needs and

PHI 413 When it comes to facilitating spiritual care for patients with worldviews different from your own, what are your strengths and weaknesses
PHI 413 When it comes to facilitating spiritual care for patients with worldviews different from your own, what are your strengths and weaknesses

try to meet them in the best way possible. Due to the fact that I am a Christian sometimes, it is hard for me to facilitate the spiritual needs of patients that have different worldviews from my own, but I make the best effort in providing what the patient needs and learns. I think an individual should have the right to their own decision-making, unless they are unable to then they would have an appointed POA. “This means that helpful interventions and ethical decision-making flow out of a person’s spirituality and not the other way around”. (Evans, 2020). Our readings state that the core of a person’s being, what he or she values pours into these important decisions (Evans, 2020).

 

Reference:

 

Evans, K.A. (2020). Intervention, ethical decision-making, and spiritual care. Practicing Dignity: An Introduction to Christian Values and Decision Making in Health Care. https://lc.gcumedia.com/phi413v/practicing-dignity-an-introduction-to-christian-values-and-decision-making-in-health-care/v1.1/#/chapter/5

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I totally agree with your contribution and also move the same motion that policies concerning spiritual care need to be standardized. I observed a very touching moment when a certain provider was in a patient’s room to discuss change of advance directives for a deteriorating patient. The patient’s family requested to pray before they could start their deliberations but the health care provider was not comfortable to be in the room as they prayed. This left me as the nurse to be with the family while the provider stepped out of the room and was only ready to be back after the prayer was done, because the provider could not believe in praying. A lack of standardization in the conceptualization and assessment of spiritual care causes challenges in reviewing, however several themes do emerge. policies are standardized, the quality of spiritual care will be enhanced (Harrad et al.,2019).

Reference:

Harrad,R., Cosentino,C., Keasley, R., & Sulla, F. Spiritual care in nursing: an overview of the measures used to assess spiritual care provision and related factors amongst nurses. Acta Biomed. 2019 Mar 28;90(4-S):44-55. doi: 10.23750/abm.v90i4-S.8300.

Facilitating spiritual care for patients that have different worldviews different from my own is a task that is relatively easy to me. A strength I have is respecting other patient’s spiritual care. If a patient wants to talk about their spiritual care I often listen and engage in conversation. A weakness I have is if the patient wants to involve me in their spiritual care. Such as giving me brochures about their religion or trying to get into my beliefs. I attempt to stay neutral with my patients.

If was a patient, I would hope that I would get to make my ethical decision-making and interventions in an even of a difficult situation. If I was unable to make a decision I would have a close family member that is neutral and has knowledge of what my wishes are. Each person’s perspective is influenced by and formed by their worldview towards faith and spirituality (Evans, 2020).

Evans, K.A. (2020). Intervention, ethical decision-making, and spiritual care. Practicing Dignity: An Introduction to Christian Values and Decision Making in Health Care. https://lc.gcumedia.com/phi413v/practicing-dignity-an-introduction-to-christian-values-and-decision-making-in-health-care/v1.1/#/chapter/5

The disadvantage of working with patients who have diverse beliefs from their own is that their biases are likely to affect their working relationship with the patients. For instance, as a Christian or a Muslim, it is hard to assume one’s beliefs (Timmins & Caldeira, 2017).

I am glad it’s easy for you. Sometimes, nurses subconsciously apply their beliefs in situations even when they do not mean to enforce their beliefs on other people. Therefore, nurses ensure nurses must ensure that they respect the spiritual beliefs of other people in their working environment. For me, I keep an open mind to others’ worldviews and spirituality as long as it doesn’t cause harm to others or myself. I try to treat each patient with the individuality respect and dignity that they deserve. I try to be nonjudgmental and not let my own views interfere with their belief system.

 

Reference

Timmins, F., & Caldeira, S. (2017). Understanding spirituality and spiritual care in nursing. Nursing Standard31(22).

In situations where I have to care for patients with different worldviews than my own, regarding spiritual care, I have learned to just remain neutral. I have learned not to give my opinion, and just to let the patient vent or speak about their belief and worldview. As long as they aren’t saying anything hurtful or disrespectful, there is no reason for me to provide them with an opposing opinion. Sometimes, a huge part of their healing journey is just being listened to and being heard. Additionally, by just listening I can learn so much about different worldviews, and I can learn to be more accommodating with my care to fit those beliefs. Each patient, regardless of their worldview, deserves to be treated equally and respectfully, and deserves to receive compassionate care, and that’s where remaining neutral comes in handy for me. Some of my weaknesses would be that sometimes, I am such a big believer in compliance with health care and how science is used to improve health, that when patients are not complaint or refuse treatments due to their worldviews, it is hard for me to accept it. I don’t pressure them into treatments or push them into my belief, but I do notice that I find myself internally disagreeing with some of the choices, even though they arent mine to make. That weakness just comes with being human.

If I were the patient in a difficult, ethics decision regarding interventions, I would hope that I would get to have the final say in what was going to be done for me. If there were a situation where I could not make the decision for myself, I would hope a person close to me who knows what I stand for and what I believe in, would make decisions on my behalf. This would most likely be my significant other of 11 years, as he knows what I would want for myself and our family.