PUB 540 A current public health area at the forefront of public health concern for past two and a half years has been disease and infection control due COVID

PUB 540 A current public health area at the forefront of public health concern for past two and a half years has been disease and infection control due COVID

PUB 540 A current public health area at the forefront of public health concern for past two and a half years has been disease and infection control due COVID

As related to the community health area of public health, the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is a federal program and policy implemented at the public and nonprofit schools levels. According to the USDA (2022), the initiative was created under the National School Lunch Act of 1964, estimated to have served 30.4 million children in 2016 alone. As described, the policy promotes the consumption of healthy diets in schools to reduce the prevalence of obesity among school-going children. Specifically, the program offers affordable nutritionally-balanced meals, effectively addressing the socio-economic causes of obesity and their correlations with health disparities. Focused on lunch for each school day, the initiative targets to reduce the high consumption of junk or unhealthy foods and snacks formerly available at school canteens and discourage parents from packing unhealthy snacks with excessive fats, sugars, and salts. Children are supplied with a balanced diet, including fruits and vegetables.

NSLP focuses on reducing obesity prevalence rates for school-going children. According to the CDC (2021), obesity levels for pediatrics are significantly high, with a prevalence estimated at 19.7% of children and adolescents, which translates to 14.7 million individuals in the population. At the same time, in children between 2 and 5, the prevalence rate for obesity is estimated at 12.7%, increasing to 20.7% in children aged between 6 and 11 years (CDC, 2021). From a pathophysiological perspective, obesity is a lifestyle condition associated with various factors, particularly the food taken. In such a case, energy imbalance due to excessive calories leads to fat accumulation, the primary cause of obesity. Eating junk food consistently increases the risk of obesity substantially. In such a case, the NSLP targets school-going children at risk of developing obesity, primarily due to poor eating habits, as well as the lack of participation in exercise.

The NSLP has a significant efficacy rate in reducing obesity risk factors and related incidence, prevalence, morbidity, and mortality levels. Subsequently, Hawkins et al. (2018) assessed the program’s impact in the rural public schools of Louisiana in 33 institutions. The data from the study targeted children from the 4th and 8th grades, promoting access to low-cost, nutritional, and well-balanced lunch to 87% of the children in the setting. From the assessments, the level of sodium in the foods offered was reduced by more than 233 mg/meal (Hawkins et al., 2018). Individuals not participating in the program consumed over 206 mg/meal of sodium, significantly increasing the risk of obesity in such a population. Moreover, there was a substantial change in the amount of sugar consumed, with the data illustrating a decrease of between 18 to 28mg/ lunch. Reducing the consumption of such foods resulted in lower obesity prevalence rates among the target population.

The NSLP reduced obesity prevalence, coupled with the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. In this regard, Kenney et al. (2020) estimate the prevention of obesity from 47% higher in 2018, although the related mortality rates are imprecise. The overall yearly change in obesity was estimated at 15% to 16% in the pre-and post-implementation of the NSLP. As a result, the policy was effective and substantially reduced obesity levels, especially among low-income family children or those affected by high levels of poverty. As highlighted, obesity rates are determined by socio-demographic factors and determinants of health. Similarly, Hawkins et al. (2018) identify reduced incidence and mortality rates related to obesity in school-going children in rural Louisiana due to the NSLP. The policy effectively reduces the associated risk factors, including high sugar, salt, and fat content, related to elevated obesity rates among school-going children. Improving child nutrition in public schools leads to improved health and lower obesity levels in the community.

References

CDC. (2021). Childhood Obesity Facts Prevalence of Childhood Obesity in the United States. https://bit.ly/3O1iKMB

Hawkins, K. R., Burton, J. H., Apolzan, J. W., Thomson, J. L., Williamson, D. A., & Martin, C. K. (2018). Efficacy of a school-based obesity prevention intervention at reducing added sugar and sodium in children’s school lunches: The LA health randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Obesity42(11), 1845-1852. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41366-018-0214-y

Kenney, E. L., Barrett, J. L., Bleich, S. N., Ward, Z. J., Cradock, A. L., & Gortmaker, S. L. (2020). Impact of the healthy, hunger-free kids acts on obesity trends. Health Affairs39(7), 1122-1129. https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2020.00133

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USDA Food and Nutrition Service | USDA-FNS. (2022). National school lunch program (NSLP) fact

PUB 540 A current public health area at the forefront of public health concern for past two and a half years has been disease and infection control due COVID
PUB 540 A current public health area at the forefront of public health concern for past two and a half years has been disease and infection control due COVID

sheet. https://www.fns.usda.gov/nslp/nslp-fact-sheetAs related to the community health area of public health, the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is a federal program and policy implemented at the public and nonprofit schools levels. According to the USDA (2022), the initiative was created under the National School Lunch Act of 1964, estimated to have served 30.4 million children in 2016 alone. As described, the policy promotes the consumption of healthy diets in schools to reduce the prevalence of obesity among school-going children. Specifically, the program offers affordable nutritionally-balanced meals, effectively addressing the socio-economic causes of obesity and their correlations with health disparities. Focused on lunch for each school day, the initiative targets to reduce the high consumption of junk or unhealthy foods and snacks formerly available at school canteens and discourage parents from packing unhealthy snacks with excessive fats, sugars, and salts. Children are supplied with a balanced diet, including fruits and vegetables.

NSLP focuses on reducing obesity prevalence rates for school-going children. According to the CDC (2021), obesity levels for pediatrics are significantly high, with a prevalence estimated at 19.7% of children and adolescents, which translates to 14.7 million individuals in the population. At the same time, in children between 2 and 5, the prevalence rate for obesity is estimated at 12.7%, increasing to 20.7% in children aged between 6 and 11 years (CDC, 2021). From a pathophysiological perspective, obesity is a lifestyle condition associated with various factors, particularly the food taken. In such a case, energy imbalance due to excessive calories leads to fat accumulation, the primary cause of obesity. Eating junk food consistently increases the risk of obesity substantially. In such a case, the NSLP targets school-going children at risk of developing obesity, primarily due to poor eating habits, as well as the lack of participation in exercise.

The NSLP has a significant efficacy rate in reducing obesity risk factors and related incidence, prevalence, morbidity, and mortality levels. Subsequently, Hawkins et al. (2018) assessed the program’s impact in the rural public schools of Louisiana in 33 institutions. The data from the study targeted children from the 4th and 8th grades, promoting access to low-cost, nutritional, and well-balanced lunch to 87% of the children in the setting. From the assessments, the level of sodium in the foods offered was reduced by more than 233 mg/meal (Hawkins et al., 2018). Individuals not participating in the program consumed over 206 mg/meal of sodium, significantly increasing the risk of obesity in such a population. Moreover, there was a substantial change in the amount of sugar consumed, with the data illustrating a decrease of between 18 to 28mg/ lunch. Reducing the consumption of such foods resulted in lower obesity prevalence rates among the target population.

The NSLP reduced obesity prevalence, coupled with the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. In this regard, Kenney et al. (2020) estimate the prevention of obesity from 47% higher in 2018, although the related mortality rates are imprecise. The overall yearly change in obesity was estimated at 15% to 16% in the pre-and post-implementation of the NSLP. As a result, the policy was effective and substantially reduced obesity levels, especially among low-income family children or those affected by high levels of poverty. As highlighted, obesity rates are determined by socio-demographic factors and determinants of health. Similarly, Hawkins et al. (2018) identify reduced incidence and mortality rates related to obesity in school-going children in rural Louisiana due to the NSLP. The policy effectively reduces the associated risk factors, including high sugar, salt, and fat content, related to elevated obesity rates among school-going children. Improving child nutrition in public schools leads to improved health and lower obesity levels in the community.

 

References

CDC. (2021). Childhood Obesity Facts Prevalence of Childhood Obesity in the United States. https://bit.ly/3O1iKMB

Hawkins, K. R., Burton, J. H., Apolzan, J. W., Thomson, J. L., Williamson, D. A., & Martin, C. K. (2018). Efficacy of a school-based obesity prevention intervention at reducing added sugar and sodium in children’s school lunches: The LA health randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Obesity42(11), 1845-1852. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41366-018-0214-y

Kenney, E. L., Barrett, J. L., Bleich, S. N., Ward, Z. J., Cradock, A. L., & Gortmaker, S. L. (2020). Impact of the healthy, hunger-free kids acts on obesity trends. Health Affairs39(7), 1122-1129. https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2020.00133

USDA Food and Nutrition Service | USDA-FNS. (2022). National school lunch program (NSLP) fact sheethttps://www.fns.usda.gov/nslp/nslp-fact-sheet