PUB 540 Explain the difference between incidence and prevalence of a disease and discuss their relationship

PUB 540 Explain the difference between incidence and prevalence of a disease and discuss their relationship

PUB 540 Explain the difference between incidence and prevalence of a disease and discuss their relationship

As discussed in the YouTube video, (Patwari, 2013, 3:39) in measuring outcomes the relationship between prevalence and incidence shows that the more disease in the community. Prevalence can be cut down by either people dying or by being cured. Therapy, such as a vaccine deceases the number of people dying because the number of people that have been taken out decreases the total number of those that have the disease due to treatment. Incidence is the amount of disease, the faster the disease comes into the community, there is an increase of incidence. Prevalence equals incidence multiplied by the duration (time) people have the disease. The best example of this is the COVID-19 vaccines at the time they were approved and available in treating or preventing severity and risk for hospitalization which was also a risk for death.

To further discuss the relationship between prevalence and incidence, (Barrat, Kirwan & Shantikumar, n.d.) talk about this relationship in terms of people that are at risk in the population. Their definition of prevalence is the existing cases of disease as part of the population and incidence is the number of new cases in the population during a certain segment of time, which equals frequency of disease compared to new cases that develop in a certain span of time is another way of putting it.

 

Reference

 

Barratt, Kirwan, & Shantikumar (n.d.). Numerators, denominators and populations at risk. Public Health Textbook, Health Knowledge. https://www.healthknowledge.org.uk/public-health-textbook/reserach-methods/1a-epidemiology/numerators-denominators-populations

 

Patwari,R. (2013). The Relationship Between Incidence and Prevalence (Video). YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1jzZe3ORdd8 

Prevalence is defined as the number of cases of a disease within a specific population within a particular time point over a given time span.  Furthermore, prevalence can be broken into point prevalence or a period prevalence. Point prevalence is the proportion of people with a disease at a particular point during a time period ( Friis & Sellers, 2021) .  On the other hand, period prevalence is the people with a specific disease during a given time period. When individuals seek health treatment and get cured during a disease or die the prevalence change.

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Incidence refers to rate of new cases in a specific population over a particular period. Prevalence includes all cases (new and pre-existing cases) and incidence refers to new cases only. For example, the number of people with asthma will depict a disease that describes incidence. There’s no cure for asthma and often it doesn’t result in mortality unless there is an exacerbation or chronic complications. Prevalence and incidence are useful for administrators when examining the need for services or treatment facilities.

 

References:

 

Friis, R. H., & Sellers, T. A. (2021). Epidemiology for public health practice (6th ed.). Jones and Bartlett Learning. ISBN-13: 9781284175431

 

Straif-Bourgeois, S., Ratard, R., & Kretzschmar, M. (2014). Infectious Disease Epidemiology. Handbook of Epidemiology, 2041–2119. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-09834-0_34

One of the crucial functions of epidemiology is to study the occurrence and distribution of diseases and health-related events (Friis & Sellers, 2021). Therefore, it involves the application of measuring data to study patterns of diseases and to identify the health outcome of the population or communities at a certain time.

Prevalence is also known as prevalence rate which is the number of existing cases of a disease or health problem in a population at a given time (Friis & Sellers, 2021). Prevalence has two types of measure; these are point prevalence and period prevalence. Point prevalence is defined as the measure of prevalence at a particular point in time, while period prevalence is the prevalence measured during an interval of time such as a month or a week. An example of the prevalence rate would be the self-reported obesity in California during 2018-to 2020 is 30.3.

The incidence rate is also known as the person-time rate which is defined as the measure or number of illnesses currently happening or of persons getting ill during a given period of time in a specific population (Friis & Sellers, 2021). Prevalence rate and incidence rate often get confused. Prevalence refers to the proportions who have a condtion during a particular time while incidence rate refers to the proportion of persons develop a condition.

 

Reference

Friis, R.H. & Sellers, T.A. (2021). Epidemiology for public health practice (6th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones

& Bartlett Learning.

One of the crucial functions of epidemiology is to study the occurrence and distribution of diseases and health-related events (Friis & Sellers, 2021). Therefore, it involves the application of measuring data to study patterns of diseases and to identify the health outcome of the population or communities at a certain time.

Prevalence is also known as prevalence rate which is the number of existing cases of a disease or health problem in a

PUB 540 Explain the difference between incidence and prevalence of a disease and discuss their relationship
PUB 540 Explain the difference between incidence and prevalence of a disease and discuss their relationship

population at a given time (Friis & Sellers, 2021). Prevalence has two types of measure; these are point prevalence and period prevalence. Point prevalence is defined as the measure of prevalence at a particular point in time, while period prevalence is the prevalence measured during an interval of time such as a month or a week. An example of the prevalence rate would be the self-reported obesity in California during 2018-to 2020 is 30.3.

The incidence rate is also known as the person-time rate which is defined as the measure or number of illnesses currently happening or of persons getting ill during a given period of time in a specific population (Friis & Sellers, 2021). Prevalence rate and incidence rate often get confused. Prevalence refers to the proportions who have a condtion during a particular time while incidence rate refers to the proportion of persons develop a condition.

 

Reference

Friis, R.H. & Sellers, T.A. (2021). Epidemiology for public health practice (6th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones

& Bartlett Learning.

One of the crucial functions of epidemiology is to study the occurrence and distribution of diseases and health-related events (Friis & Sellers, 2021). Therefore, it involves the application of measuring data to study patterns of diseases and to identify the health outcome of the population or communities at a certain time.

Prevalence is also known as prevalence rate which is the number of existing cases of a disease or health problem in a population at a given time (Friis & Sellers, 2021). Prevalence has two types of measure; these are point prevalence and period prevalence. Point prevalence is defined as the measure of prevalence at a particular point in time, while period prevalence is the prevalence measured during an interval of time such as a month or a week. An example of the prevalence rate would be the self-reported obesity in California during 2018-to 2020 is 30.3.

The incidence rate is also known as the person-time rate which is defined as the measure or number of illnesses currently happening or of persons getting ill during a given period of time in a specific population (Friis & Sellers, 2021). Prevalence rate and incidence rate often get confused. Prevalence refers to the proportions who have a condtion during a particular time while incidence rate refers to the proportion of persons develop a condition.

 

Reference

Friis, R.H. & Sellers, T.A. (2021). Epidemiology for public health practice (6th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones

& Bartlett Learning.